June 2005 archives

Comment Policy

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Comments are welcome and an important part of my blog, and readers are very welcome and encouraged to leave comments in the blog posts. Questions will be answered in the comments at my discretion and due to the number of comments some posts have, and my other work, I’m unable to answer every comment. And in other cases, I may answer inquiries personally via e-mail and may not publish the comment.

So please use a valid e-mail address when sending in a comment. E-mail addresses are hidden from the public view and will not be used for any other purpose, nor are they shared or published in any way.

If no comment field appears at the end of a published post and comments, that means that the post is closed for comments. And if you have a question, it’s likely been answered in the comments previously and I don’t wish to comment further on it for various reasons.

1. Comments and URLs which link to commercial websites or blogs will immediately be deleted.

The exception is if the link is part of the discussion, ie: If someone asks where they can find a certain item or product, and another reader leaves a comment with a link to where it can be obtained.

2. Please do not leave the name or URL to your website or blog in the body of your comment.

There is a space for that where you enter your name and e-mail address, and it will automatically be linked to your website or blog. URLs that don’t relate to comments will be stripped out.

The exception to that if you are linking to an entry on your blog or website that is relevant to the discussion. Examples include if you’ve attempted a similar recipe or you have a post on your website or blog that adds to the discussion. You are welcome to leave a link, but please format it in HTML, (tutorials here and here), which will make it easier for readers to visit your site.

3. Comments may be edited for grammar, spelling, or content.

4. Comments may be moderated and may not appear on the blog without approval.

5. Comments may be deleted at any time, without notice.

6. If you find a broken link or typographical error, you are welcome to point it out.

But please realize that due to the temporal nature of blogs, those are both bound to happen and if you wish to mention it, tact is appreciated.

7. Diverse points of view are welcome but please keep the conversation civil.

The comments often become forums for discussion amongst readers, which is encouraged, but name-calling or baiting comments will be edited or deleted.

8. One-third of the readers of this blog live outside the United States

Please keep that in mind and readers should be sensitive to cultural differences and values when leaving comments or responding to others.

9. Anything written in ALL CAPS will be deleted.

10. Don’t Be a Douche.

Having worked in restaurant kitchens for over three decades, there isn’t anything that I haven’t seen, or heard. Trust me.

Blog Policies

If you have questions about various policies of the blog, you will likely find the answers at these links:

Disclosure Statement

Frequently Asked Questions

How to Use the Comment Feed

Restaurant Write Up Policy

How to Find Foods and Other Items Mentioned On the Site



Me and Pam Anderson, Tonight On Fox

One of my favorite actresses, and the first lady of American theater, Pamela Anderson, has a new progam called ‘Stacked’ on Fox television wednesday nights. Starring alongside Pam (who plays a bookstore clerk), and prominently displayed behind her enormous talents, is Ripe For Dessert.

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Check us out tonight!

Paris Pastry Shops

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Paris has some of the most amazing pastry and chocolate shops in the world!

I’ve written up many of them and you can browse through my archives to find out more about them: Paris Pastry Shops.

A recommended book for visitors is The P√Ętisseries of Paris: A Paris Pastry Guide, which lists many favorites, along with addresses and specialties.

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L’As du Fallafel

A favorite quick-bite on the streets of Paris, at L’As du Fallafel.

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L’As du Fallafel is one of the few places where Parisians chow down on the street. Beginning with a fork, dig into warm pita bread stuffed with marinated crunchy cabbage, silky eggplant, sesame hoummous, and boules of chick-pea paste, crisp-fried fallafel. Spice it up with a dab of searingly-hot sauce piquante.

L’As du Fallafel: 34, rue de Rosiers, in the Marais. Open every day, except closed friday beginning at sundown, reopening for lunch sunday.