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New York/Brooklyn Booksigning: Friday, October 10th

This Friday, October 10th, I’ll be at The Brooklyn Kitchen for a book party!

My Paris Kitchen Book Cover

For this free event, on hand will be samples to tasting from My Paris Kitchen, and there will be copies of Ready for Dessert, a collection of my all-time favorite dessert recipes, and My Paris Kitchen, a collection of stories and recipes from my French kitchen, that I’m happy to sign for you. And – gulp – since holiday season is slowly approaching, signed copies of my books make great gifts for friends and family. I’m just sayin’…

Ready for dessert cover blog

The fun, food, and wine will take place from 6pm to 8pm.

If you can’t make it to the shop, or live elsewhere, and would like a signed book, you can order one from The Brooklyn Kitchen — I’ll sign it, and they’ll send it. Click here to order.

The Brooklyn Kitchen
100 Frost Street (map)
Brooklyn, New York
(718) 389-2982

[If you plan to come, you're invited to confirm on the Facebook Event page to let them know about how many guests to expect, although it's not required to RSVP. If you have other questions about the event, feel free to contact The Brooklyn Kitchen.]

Paris Booksigning at Treize…a baker’s dozen, this Sunday

This coming weekend I’ll be at Treize…a baker’s dozen, in Paris on Sunday, October 5th, from noon to 1pm.

My Paris Kitchen

I’ll be signing copies of My Paris Kitchen at one of the latest, and sweetest, cafés in Paris – Treize…a baker’s dozen. Located in a gorgeous Left Bank courtyard, Treize…a baker’s dozen, where owner and chef Laurel Sanderson charms locals and expats with her home-style cooking, much of it rooted in flavors from her native South Carolina. Yet blended with a French sensibility, and French ingredients.

The café serves lunch, brunch and le goûter (afternoon snack), and readers of My Paris Kitchen will be familiar with Laurel, as she inspired a story and recipe in My Paris Kitchen. I’m excited to be a guest in her café for this event.

Treize_Logo__-_davidmlebovitz_gmail_com_-_Gmail

There will be copies of My Paris Kitchen available, and you’re welcome to bring previously purchased books as well. Looking forward to seeing you on Sunday!

[Note that there is a brunch from 1 to 4pm, which is sold-out. But this event is open to all from Noon to 1pm. If you'd like to RSVP to let them know you're coming, you can on the Facebook Event page.]

London and Paris Book Events

My Paris Kitchen

– Next week I’ll be doing a chat and book signing on Monday, June 2nd, in London, in conjunction with the folks at Toast. There will be snacks, treats, nibbles, and – yes, cocktails! Sign up here.

– And on Saturday, June 7th, I’ll be at WHSmith in Paris from 3:30 to 5pm signing books as well. No need to sign up. Just stop by!

q & a

Rocky Road

I just returned from a four-week book tour where I met a lot of people. Everyone was incredibly nice and it was a treat, although because of the nature of the events, it wasn’t possible to spend lots of one-on-one time with anyone – including myself. However, I tried to answer as many questions as possible. The most frequently asked questions were; “Where have you been?” “Where are you going?” and, curiously, “When you are leaving?” I’ll assume the last one was people just being polite. (I hope!)

Another popular question was about mes bonnes adresses in Paris, or favorite places to eat. While I update the list on the My Paris page regularly, and there are more complete descriptions in the Paris restaurant category on the site, I suspect people thought I was holding out on them. (I swear, I’m not! – well, maybe one or two…but I have my reasons…) I was also interested in how many people were coming to Paris in the near future, which may explain the rise in airfares this summer, which are preventing us from going to Cape Cod and having a lobster, steamer clam, beer, and corn-on-the-cob fest.

Continue Reading q & a…

My Paris Kitchen book tour

My Paris Kitchen

I’ve finally reached a milestone in my life because I am actually going on a book tour. Yes, I can barely believe it myself. After years of publishers hiding me, aka “the loose cannon,” they are releasing me into the wild. I’ll be heading to the U.S. and Vancouver for a series of events to mark the release of My Paris Kitchen. While I’d love to go everywhere*, there’s only one (1) of me, and fifty (50) states – not to mention the provinces, territories, and wilds of Canada. However, if anyone can get me to Hawaii and arrange an event close to the beach, I will work on my publisher to find a way to accommodate that one. (But you may have to invite them to come with me.) So, in spite of how easy the airlines make it to change tickets, and the low-fees involved in doing so, this is it.

Continue Reading My Paris Kitchen book tour…

Paris Book Signing This Sunday

perfectscoopThis Sunday, I’ll be doing a book signing with my friends at The House That Jack Built as part of their Valentine Jumble Sale. The event will take place at Le Mary Celeste (1, rue Commines, 3rd, Métro: Filles du Calvaire or République).There will be copies of The Perfect Scoop sale priced in hardcover and paperback, in addition to a limited amount of copies of The Sweet Life in Paris and Ready for Dessert.

I’ll be there from Noon to 3pm (the sale continues until 5pm) and you’re welcome to bring copies of previously owned books you’ve purchased elsewhere. There will be vintage items, cocktail punch, and Alison’s sweet-salty treats. So if you’re around this Sunday – stop by and say hi!

Should You Remove the Green Germ from Garlic?

Garlic

Garlic has a season, and depending on where you live, that season is usually spring through mid-summer. In France, we get ail nouveau, which are heads of garlic that are very plump and slightly soft, whose moist skin is tinged with a bit of pink. As it ages, the garlic becomes more rosy in color, and there is even a special “rose” garlic in France called ail rose de Lautrec, whose status is certified by the French government. As the months progress, garlic season ends and the remaining heads go into storage.

Garlic

In France, garlic that has been kept is often referred to as ail sec, or dried garlic. And in many cases, during storage, those cloves of garlic will develop a green germ inside that is said to be bitter and should be removed. I know, because I’ve said that myself. But I’ve never really put it to the test. So when a friend, who worked closely with Marcella Hazan (an expert on Italian cuisine) told me that Marcella never removed the green germ (her reasoning being that since it was new garlic in the making, it was tender and not bitter), I figured it would be interesting to see – and taste – if removing it really did make a difference.

Continue Reading Should You Remove the Green Germ from Garlic?…

Judy Rodgers

I was deeply saddened when I heard that someone who happens to have been a culinary icon (and hero) of mine, and who I was fortunate enough to work with in the kitchen, is no longer standing behind her stove. This morning I learned that Judy Rodgers the chef-owner of Zuni Café, had passed. I was fortunate the work with Judy for a few years on and off at Chez Panisse. Judy was incredibly dynamic as a person; so much so that I think even she had trouble dealing with all her energy! She was also a dynamic cook. And like the best cooks, her food wasn’t ever about her: It was about the food.

The roast chicken with bread salad at Zuni was the most iconic dish she made and was always worth waiting for. (Although once we drank too many martinis from the bar while we waited for it, and when I got home, I realized that I’d skipped out on the bill! – which I did go back and pay the next day.) The Caesar Salad at the restaurant was the best you could get, as were the pillow-light ricotta gnocchi and the excellent hamburger, which was perfect in every way. Whatever Judy made, was the best. In fact, one of the best things I ever ate in my entire life was a simple salad she’d handed to me one night at Chez Panisse, composed of escarole, rabbit loin, potatoes, and garlic confit smeared on toasts, all tumbled together with a warm, mustardy-dressing. I never dreamed a simple salad could taste so good, and I still remember the exact moment when I put the first forkful in my mouth – it was so, so good, and I still think about it nearly twenty-five years later.

Continue Reading Judy Rodgers…