Results tagged Adam Roberts from David Lebovitz

Shakshuka

Shakshuka

I’ve been meaning to get into the Shakshuka groove ever since I had it for breakfast at Nopi in London, and on my trip to Israel, where this North African dish wowed me – and my taste buds – every morning. Although various versions abound, the most widely known Shakshuka involves eggs softly cooked in a hot skillet of spiced tomato sauce. I’ve had plenty of spicy foods in my life, but the complex seasoning in the sauces that I’ve tasted in the ones I had lingered with me for months afterward, and I had no choice but to make it at home. (Or move to London – or North Africa.)

Continue Reading Shakshuka…

Blog Notes / Links / Misc

Misc. thoughts, notes, and links from around the web…


Links

I recently read several excellent articles online about food writing. So much has changed in the last few years, and like most mediums, newspapers, magazines, blogs, and websites continue to evolve.

How to Blog
The editor of Boing Boing discusses the current state of blogging and offers a fresh perspective and tips.

Advice from Every Angle
Seasoned food writer Amanda Hesser assesses the current state of food writing.

How to Blog About Food
A good compendium of tips for new, emerging, and aspiring food bloggers.

Food Blogging
An article I wrote last year with some of my own ideas and advice on the topic.

Are Food Blogs Over?
Adam Roberts talks about the saturation of food blogs and offers insights.

Paris’s Best Croissants
On another note, I took a little ‘croissant quest’ for Travel and Leisure magazine, sleuthing out places in Paris for the best croissant. I veered off the usual path and hit the Right Bank, mentioning a few lesser-known addresses.


Paris & Switzerland Chocolate and Gastronomy Tour in June

We have two spaces left on my upcoming Paris and Switzerland Chocolate and Gastronomy Tour in June (due to a last-minute cancellation.) Requirements are that you must be able to consume large quantities of chocolate and caramel, reasonable amounts of butter and cheese, wine (as necessary), and plenty of charcuterie. If you fit this description and are interested in coming – or want more information – there’s a link on my Tours page for getting in touch with the contact person.


Comments

There’s a trend to use external commenting systems on blogs but I’m not sure I like the idea of folks having to log-in elsewhere to participate in the discussion. Discussions, tips, advice, and commentary of various sorts are welcome but you must leave a verifiable e-mail address (which isn’t made public, or shared), as noted in my comment policy. I may be revisiting using another system in the future that can be integrated into the site. But for now, I prefer to keep it as is.


Links to Services I’m Using

Dropbox
I was trying to figure out an easy way to move documents and pictures from my computer to mobile devices, and friends recommended Dropbox. It’s very easy to use and the basic version is free. You can also share documents and stuff with others on it as well.

Flipboard
If you have an iPad or iPhone, this application turns your device into a virtual magazine, allowing you to choose from sites (including mine), social networks, newspapers, and magazines, which Flipboard organizes into a magazine-like format.

Rue La La
One of my tour guests turned me on to Rue La La when I was eying her Tumi suitcase, so I joined and in addition to suitcases, I keep seeing amazing deals on everything from Le Creuset and Staub cookware, to KitchenAid mixers and Cuisinart food processors. The prices are great, but you have to act fast.

(Note: Membership in Rue La La is by invitation only. You can use that link as an invitation and Rue La La provides me with credit toward my own future luggage. But membership is free.)

Eating Out & About in New York City

empire state buildingshake shack burger
shake shack french frieskorean dumplings nyc

I was recently conversing with someone about what excites (and stuns) French people when they come to the United States. Supermarkets are always interesting places to go; last time I took Romain to one in Florida, he came out and said “Pas de stress!” because shopping in a French supermarket can be an exercise in frustration. (Which is putting it mildly.)

welcome to bank

Someone suggested that I take him to a bank, because there is no place more stressful, or more unwelcoming, than a bank in France. I was recently having a discussion about how distrustful my bank seems to be of customers and a friend stunned me by saying that banks have so many rules and blockades in place because “…you shouldn’t be trusted with your own money.”

Continue Reading Eating Out & About in New York City…

New York City Dining and Travel Notes

pretzels empire state building

I had a wonderful trip to New York City recently and shared some of the places that I visited (see links at end of post), but there were plenty more places that I ate at, which didn’t get mentioned in previous posts. So here’s a round-up of them…

katz's corned beef sandwich

Katz’s

Most of the good delis are gone in New York City, but Katz’s is an institution and I like to believe it’s never going to let me down. I’ve had great meals there, but on this visit, my corned beef was tough and almost all of the meat inside my sandwich was inedible. A sandwich that costs $14.50, plus tax, should be museum-quality.

Continue Reading New York City Dining and Travel Notes…

Amnesty Cookies

baking cookies

When I was speaking at the Blogher Food Conference last year, one of the organizers was telling us that on the last day of each month, she carries out what she calls E-mail Amnesty Day. On that day, she deletes all her e-mail in her Inbox, then issues an all-points-bulletin to everyone she knows that if there was anything important in there, to e-mail her again. She swore that it drastically reduced her e-mail and any meltdowns one might have trying to answer it all.

I thought that was an interesting idea, and when I looked around my apartment the other day, (which wasn’t half as scary as my Inbox), I realized that I had a huge miscellany of half-bags and jars of stuff left over from various baking projects, odds and ends that I was saving, which I said to myself (at the time) that I’d certainly use in the future. And this weekend, I thought it was high time to do something about it and get rid of them all, to do an exhaustive, clean sweep and get rid of everything.

kit-kat bars ingredients for compost cookies

What also prompted the purge was when I read where Adam made something called “Compost Cookies”, a recipe which includes anything you wish to dump in it, from chocolate chips to Fritos.

Continue Reading Amnesty Cookies…

Simplify It Sunday

bread bar jules

Just taking a breather here and thought I’d share some thoughts as I looked at my crazy Inbox this weekend. I switched to Gmail last year and things just keep moving down as they come in, until they turn the corner and head into the ‘older’ page (ie: Siberia). Where they get forgotten. So yesterday, I deleted a few messages. As in, a few hundred messages. I don’t even recall what many of them were about, or why I was saving them, but invariably a few likely got tossed that I probably should have answered. Drat.

There’s a concept I’ve been hearing about called declaring “bankruptcy”. It’s not about the global financial meltdown, but it’s about preventing another kind of meltdown by simply starting back again from zero, a blank slate. It’s an interesting idea and it’s nice to do a bit of spring cleaning now and then, even though spring is a few months away, unfortunately. (Although it did give me an excuse to buy a killer-stylin’ new overcoat for winter last Wednesday.)

Continue Reading Simplify It Sunday…

Writing Your Own Cookbook

Many folks dream of turning their recipes into a cookbook and I hope to answer some of the questions you might have about the process in a concise manner. Below are some pointers that might help you out but there’s lots of other great tips out there and I encourage you to read as much as you can. (I’ve provided some great links at the end.)

books4.jpg

In this post I offer some advice, but more important, interspersed are a lot of questions for you to ask yourself. There are no right or wrong answers, just points to consider and to help you refine your idea as you pursue your goal. These are not meant to discourage, but to encourage you to think about your project so that you can best position it, in case you decide to try to sell it and get it published.

[Note: This post was revised and updated in 2013, to reflect some of the changes and innovations in the publishing industry, including some interesting self-publishing options.]

Here are ten tips to help you get started:

1. Start With A Great Idea

Come up with an idea. And while you’re at it, make it a good one.

Perhaps you have a bevy of good recipes. Or you want to be famous and have a show on television. Maybe you want to be rich. All are reasons to write a book. But the best is because you want to share your great food and terrific stories with readers. If you look at your favorite cookbooks, each one has at least one recipe that’s amazing, that you make over and over again. If not, the author’s voice rings through and you like thumbing through it for the writing or the photographs. In either case, there’s something about it that excites you.

As Regina Schrambling wrote about Julia Child “…everyone wants to be her, but no one would dream of putting in 10 years of obsessive work on a cookbook.” Yes indeed, Julia spent ten years writing Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Are you willing to spend ten years laboring over a manuscript? That’s probably not likely and shouldn’t take that long, but you should believe in your idea enough to obsess over it night and day during the time you’re writing it, and be willing to spend a big chunk of your life devoted to it.

2. Find Your Niche

Saying you’re doing ‘seasonal and regional foods’ isn’t enough anymore. Everyone does that—or says they do…what makes yours any better? Find something else or work within that genre.

There are thousands of cookbooks that come out every year. Think about what makes you buy the ones you buy? Would your book appeal to you? Is this the kind of book you could see in a bookstore? Right now, we’re in the middle of a Food Network blitz. If you don’t believe me, head over to your local Border’s or Barnes and Noble and gaze out at all the happy grins looking back at you.

Like it or not, that’s what’s out there and that’s what people are buying. If they weren’t, no one would be selling them. Big-box bookstores exist to make money and they’re trying to sell books so most likely, ‘One Hundred Recipes from Tammy Terrific’ can’t compete with ‘One Hundred Meals from Rachel Ray’. Since they only have limited space, you need to give them a reason to carry your particular book. How is yours going to compete?

One way is to evaluate cooking trends. Scope Amazon and cookware shops. Is there a new item on the horizon that might need a cookbook to be sold alongside, like a panini-grill, a home smoker, a blow torch, or an ice cream maker? Are there any foods coming down the pipeline that might need recipes or merit further explanation? Soy, gluten-free, whole grains, and home-cooking are all popular right now. But what’s next? Hamburgers? Ceviche? Organic? A low-protein diet? What’s the next big thing?

3. Find An Agent

While it’s not imperative to have an agent, most editors and publishers give top-priority to proposals submitted by an agent. One editor told me she gets twenty proposals a day and frankly, doesn’t have the time to even look at most of them let alone respond. The best way to find an agent is to look at cookbooks that you like, check the acknowledgments, and take note of the agent. Then do some research to contact them with your proposal.

A good agent knows exactly where to send your proposal and is on good terms with the top editors. If an agent accepts to take you on, that means they can sell it or will try to, since no one wants to push something they don’t believe in. You may get passed over by an agent for no apparent reason (trust me on that one…) as they may have a similar proposal on their docket or another author working in the same genre. (Same with editors. You may simply get rejected based on the fact they have a book in print or in the pipeline on the same subject.)

Done right, with the help of an agent, your proposal can land on an editors desk the next day. A good agent will also help a writer shape that proposal and they handle on the contractual and legalese. Not that they have a crystal-ball into the future, but they do have their fingers on what’s selling and what’s not. As mentioned, you can sell a proposal without an agent but a good one will understand your concept and work on your behalf to get you’re your book sold. Finding an agent is one crucial part of the puzzle and in my opinion, one that’s important.

4. The Proposal

When I tell people I spent around eight months just working on just the proposal for my ice cream book, they’re shocked. But editors want to see a full and clear vision of what you’re going to write about. It’s especially true for a first-time author, but even for someone who’s written several books. Each book is a brand new project and requires a fresh start. And often the editors have to answer to higher-ups in marketing, sales, etc…and don’t, in general, have the last word.

Included in the proposal should be extensive samples of content, the tables of contents, recipe list and sample recipes if applicable, as well as a winning biography of you. And very importantly, a plan for how the book will sell once its published. Including as much as possible in there is a good idea, perhaps a sample chapter or two. But be careful: One editor told me she got a very good proposal but it was accompanied by some homemade cupcakes which were terrible and she found them, half-eaten, tossed in the trash of the employee break room where she left them for the staff. Not a good sign.

So most important: this is the time to give this your very best shot. Be concise and self-critical, and only send in your best effort. Editors are simply too busy to take the time to sift through a lot of material so your proposal should be, as they say, a ‘killer app’.

TIP: Publishers these days love numbers; Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter followers, as well as blog traffic. When you proposal lands at an editor, they need to “sell” the idea to the marketing team and nowadays those numbers have become important. They’re not vital, but the more followers that you have, the stronger your proposal will be. If you don’t have high numbers, don’t be discouraged. But and explanation of your social media and platforms will improve your position.

5. Give It Time

From the time you start writing down ideas, the proposal is written, the book sold, the book written and edited, and then printed and released, most books take much longer to come to fruition than people imagine. Plan on at least two years from the moment you start your quest until you see something tangible.

Most books have a one year lead time, which means you generally have a year to write the book. Then it can take another year to edit, re-test recipes, design and photograph the book. Finally, another year passes before the book is on the shelves.

6. Paying For It

Although it sounds tempting to live off your writing, for most writers, it ain’t their ship coming in. According to Dianne Jacob, in Will Write For Food, in her survey she notes a first-time author can expect to get a $5k-$25k advance.

But even if you get, let’s say, $50k, that might sound like a lot of money. So figure your agent gets 15%, the IRS gets 27%, plus figure $5k in expenses like food costs, printer cartridges (why are those things so darn expensive?), and equipment. And if you’re anything like me, you’ll go through a lot of pajama bottoms too, the preferred ‘uniform’ of those who work at home. So that’s approximately $25,000 for a good 1-2 years of full-time work.

Most people who write books do something else to supplement their income: teach classes, lead tours, consult, have a restaurant or go to real jobs where they have to get dressed and leave the house for each day. Others marry rich. I’m not kidding.

7. Going Inside and Outside Your Blog

If you have a blog, use your blog to practice and refine what you do. Since anyone can start a blog, use yours to go out on a limb and write something outside your comfort zone.

If you’re used to writing recipes, for example, do a review of a product, visit a food producer, conduct an interview—whatever. Keep a theme going, but challenge yourself on occasion. If you want, keep your blog private and just use it for practice. Very few writers just start tapping a keyboard, or pick up a pen, and write something magnificent. I’m the exception. (Just kidding!) Most of good writing is editing. Step away, then come back to your writing. Or ask a friend who has good sensibilities, that you respect, to read what you wrote and get some feedback.

Another option is to use a writing coach. This can be money well spent if they get you motivated to write the book you want to write.

Important: If you’re going to ask someone for help, you should thank them properly. A lot of people give advice freely and graciously; I can’t even begin to thank those who helped me enough. But do take the time and have the courtesy to acknowledge the assistance of others. It’ll come back to you in spades and you’ll gain the respect and trust of others for acknowledging their contribution to your success.

8. Sell It

It all comes down to selling. There’s lots of great ideas for cookbooks out there, but if you want to do a book, you need to have an idea that’s salable since most publishing houses are now owned by larger, global media corporations who are looking at the bottom line. But there are independents still out there that do superb cookbooks. See what’s out there, look at what publishing houses are releasing and what people are buying. Differentiate yourself from the pack if necessary, or go with the flow.

Say your book is all about making great salads. Great! Does the world need another book of salads? No. Do you have something extra to offer? Is there something special about your salads that make them different? Are you using a new product or vegetable to make those salads? If you do, that could be your hook.

People often want to publish treasured family recipes. If you are thinking along those lines, make sure to explain what makes your family special, and why are those recipes. Just because friends ask you for them, you need to explain in your proposal that ten- or twenty-five thousand other people will pay $30 for a book of them. Is your family from an ethnic group noted for something special (ie: Korean pickles, Swedish cordials, French dips, etc)? Is there something in your family’s culinary history that stands out?

Italian cooking is another popular topic. You may have a lot of great pasta recipes. But how does that make you different from the multitude of established (and already published) Italian cooking authors, like Faith Willinger or Marcella Hazan? Find what makes you different from the rest of the pack. Is it your take on it? Is it your personality? Are there techniques that are groundbreaking or truly exceptional that you can share?

9. Do It Yourself

If you want to write a book just for the fun of it, or to sell, there’s several places online to do-it-yourself and that can be a lot of fun if you have the pluck to do it yourself. In the past few years, many options have opened up, such as publishing an e-book through Amazon, Lulu.com, and Apple offers an iBooks Author publishing tool.

And there are apps for creating your own cookbook as well, such as Cookbook Cafe.

You don’t need to go through a traditional publisher and you have complete control over every aspect of the book, but self-published books need to find an audience so they sell best if you have some sort of outlet for sales, such as a blog or another medium. Another aspect is publicity. You won’t have a publishing house behind you pushing your book and making media contacts so you’ll need to take that on yourself. Still, no one’s as concerned about your book as you, and there are many self-published authors that sell tons of books on their own.

10. Do You Click?

In these cost-conscious times, if you have photographic skills, that can be a huge plus. Cookbook photography and styling is very expensive, costing nearly $1k per photo. So imagine the budget for a book with fifty, full-color professional photos. (And often the price of the book reflects that.)

If you are a good photographer, or are willing to learn, that can work to your advantage nowadays. If you can do a good job and save the publisher some money, that just might be a major plus in your favor during these cash-strapped times. Include samples in your proposal, but make sure they’re the very best you’re capable of doing.

Lastly, don’t be discouraged. Julia Child was rejected by almost every publishing house because Mastering the Art of French Cooking wasn’t considered a salable book. Later in life, another of her books was turned down, which became a huge success as well. The folks who wrote The Silver Palate Cookbook came up with the idea over drinks at home one night and had no idea what they were doing. But they took a risk, worked hard, and it paid off: They got the book they wanted, it met with great success, and the rest – as they say – is history.

This is just a general overview and there are lots more to consider if you want to write a cookbook. But I hope these questions and suggestions give you a good introduction to the process – good luck!


A few excellent books that I recommend are:

- Will Write For Food,

-Recipes Into Type (out of print, but worth tracking down)

-The Recipe Writer’s Handbook


Related Posts and Links

Submission Requirements (Literary Agent Lisa Ekus)

So You Want to Publish a Cookbook (Justin Schwartz)

Before You Write that Cookbook (Cookbook Editor Susan Friedland)

From Blog to Book: How to Turn Your Ideas Into Reality (Chronicle Books)

How to Write a Nonfiction Book Proposal (Blogher)

How to Get a Cookbook Published (Andrea Nguyen of Viet World Kitchen)

Turn Your Blog Into a Book, Part I, and Part 2 (Gina Trapani of Lifehacker)

Chronicle Books’ submission guidelines as well as those from Ten Speed Press.

Five Secrets to Getting a Book Deal (Alan Rinzler)

Turning your blog into a book (Problogger)

So You Want to Write a Cookbook (Betterbaking.com)

How to write about food (Adam Roberts of The Amateur Gourmet)

Cookbook editor Justin Schwartz writes When is a cookbook deal too good to be true?

Media Bistro: Information and forums for authors & writers pitching ideas.

Modern Etiquette: Asking for a Favor (Design*Sponge)

Read how one man’s book became a #1 bestseller—even though it was turned down by 13 out of 14 publishers.

Questions & Answers with Dianne Jacob, writing coach and editor, about writing a cookbook.

Lulu.com and iUniverse both offer self-publishing and distribution options.

Tools and books: Resources I recommend for budding food writers.

10 Reasons The Amateur Gourmet Should Come to Paris

10 Reasons The Amateur Gourmet Should Come to Paris…

1. They have no idea who Bobby Flay is.

2. The have no idea who Rachel Ray is.

3. They know who Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes are, but don’t care.

4. Scientology is illegal.

5. Since they wouldn’t let Oprah into Hermès, there’s an unclaimed Birkin bag for Adam’s mom.

6. They know who Oprah is, but don’t care.

7. Yes, figs are really in season here.

8. “Brangelina” and “Bennifer” are not in the French vocabulary.

9. Richard Quest has been ‘on assignment’ for a suspiciously long time.

10. We need some New Yorkers here to show Parisians that you can’t just walk right into people and expect not to get slugged.

Bonus Reason:

11. Carrie Bradshaw left.