Results tagged Dianne Jacob from David Lebovitz

Blogher Food ’11, Atlanta

hota sauce

People often ask me how many times I get back to the states. I don’t know why this is such a pressing question but having just gotten off a plane after 1 1/2 days of sitting on plane, where the guy next to me coughed all night* – and he was kind enough to cover his mouth (although each and every time he did, he jabbed me awake with his elbow) – then sitting in a crowded airport bus for nearly two hours in rush hour traffic from de Gaulle at 7am for my final sprint home, I can honestly still say the BlogHer Food conference was well-worth the trip.

The nice thing about the annual BlogHer Food conference is that it’s a good mélange of food folks, from everyday cooks to professional, both of whom happen to have blogs. There aren’t a lot of places in the world where people converge like this on similar footing and it’s fun to chew the fat with young folks under the age of twenty along with folks coaxing bloggers to engage in more adult activities.

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Favorite Cookbooks of 2010

2010 was a very big year for cookbooks. And when I say “big”, I don’t just mean there were plenty of great cookbooks published this year, but some of them were huge. Ready for Dessert tipped the baker’s scale at over 3-pounds, and subsequent books that continued throughout the year tested the limits of my strength, such as Bon Appétit Desserts, which weighs in at a whopping 6-pounds.

But as they say, “Size doesn’t matter” and I found myself attracted to a variety of cookbooks of all dimensions. Here are a few cookbooks, baking tomes, and food-related books that were released this year or that I featured on the site in 2010.


Around My French Table

You’d never know that Dorie Greenspan only spends one-third of her time in Paris because after reading through this massive collection of three hundred fabulous recipes, she nails the city and the food, including stories and recipes from the restaurants, markets, and most endearingly, her stable of Parisian friends—which makes mine look like the unwashed masses. Her moist French Apple Cake was enjoyed from breakfast around here, and eating cake for breakfast probably isn’t very French, but tant pis.

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Food Blogger Camp, part 2

fresh catch

There’s nothing that can kill a great trip more than a bad airline experience. But since Twitter has now become the airline’s biggest public relations headache, I won’t complain about anything. Okay, except for the guy sitting in front of me for the 12-plus hour flight, who kept insisting that if he just leaned forward, then slammed his body backwards, his seat back would go back even further than the seat physically, would actually allow.

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So even though it took a few minutes after we landed to remove my knees from my chest, (although I think I need to get some medical attention tomorrow for my bijoux de famille), I still have managed to keep a smile on my face after winging my way back from Ixtapa, Mexico for our first-ever Food Blogger Camp.

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Aside from hooking up with my blogging pals; Elise, Matt, Jaden, Adam, Diane, and Dianne, I also met Diane’s other half, Todd, and Michael Ruhlman, who proved a formidable foe for the entire week. I don’t think we agreed about anything, except that we always agreed that we disagreed with each other.

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Announcing Food Blogger Camp at Club Med in Ixtapa

Do you dream of idling away on a sunny beach in the middle of the winter?

Do you want to meet other food bloggers from all over the world?

Do you want to spend your vacation with me?

The Blogger Bunch

Ok, you don’t have to answer that last one. But if you do, I’m going to be a featured participant at Food Blogger Camp, taking place January 9-16th, 2010.

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While camp is in session, each day there will be a seminar by my favorite food bloggers, food stylist, and photographers.

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Writing Your Own Cookbook

Many folks dream of turning their recipes into a cookbook and I hope to answer some of the questions you might have about the process in a concise manner. Below are some pointers that might help you out but there’s lots of other great tips out there and I encourage you to read as much as you can. (I’ve provided some great links at the end.)

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In this post I offer some advice, but more important, interspersed are a lot of questions for you to ask yourself. There are no right or wrong answers, just points to consider and to help you refine your idea as you pursue your goal. These are not meant to discourage, but to encourage you to think about your project so that you can best position it, in case you decide to try to sell it and get it published.

[Note: This post was revised and updated in 2013, to reflect some of the changes and innovations in the publishing industry, including some interesting self-publishing options.]

Here are ten tips to help you get started:

1. Start With A Great Idea

Come up with an idea. And while you’re at it, make it a good one.

Perhaps you have a bevy of good recipes. Or you want to be famous and have a show on television. Maybe you want to be rich. All are reasons to write a book. But the best is because you want to share your great food and terrific stories with readers. If you look at your favorite cookbooks, each one has at least one recipe that’s amazing, that you make over and over again. If not, the author’s voice rings through and you like thumbing through it for the writing or the photographs. In either case, there’s something about it that excites you.

As Regina Schrambling wrote about Julia Child “…everyone wants to be her, but no one would dream of putting in 10 years of obsessive work on a cookbook.” Yes indeed, Julia spent ten years writing Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Are you willing to spend ten years laboring over a manuscript? That’s probably not likely and shouldn’t take that long, but you should believe in your idea enough to obsess over it night and day during the time you’re writing it, and be willing to spend a big chunk of your life devoted to it.

Note: If you want to contact someone who is a cookbook author, agent, or editor to pick their brain be aware that you are asking someone to take time from their own work and life, to consult with you on yours. Read Modern Etiquette: Asking for a favor, which has guidelines on how to approach someone. Keep inquiries short and sweet. Get to the point – don’t just say, “I want to write a cookbook. Can you tell me what I should do?” And for the sake of everyone’s eyes, avoid superfluous text and use spacing between paragraphs. If someone is a professional editor, ask if there is a fee for the initial consultation if you have a lot of questions and want to set up a time to talk.

2. Find Your Niche

Saying you’re doing “seasonal and regional foods” isn’t enough anymore. Everyone does that—or says they do…what makes yours any better? Find something else, or work within that genre.

There are thousands of cookbooks that come out every year. Think about what makes you buy the ones you buy? Would your book appeal to you? Is this the kind of book you could see in a bookstore? Head to your local bookstore or online and see what is on display, and selling.

Like it or not, that’s what’s out there and that’s what people are buying. If they weren’t, no one would be selling them. Big-box bookstores exist to make money and they’re trying to sell books so most likely, ‘One Hundred Recipes from Tammy Terrific’ can’t compete with ‘One Hundred Meals from Rachel Ray’. Since they only have limited space, you need to give them a reason to carry your particular book. How is yours going to fit in, and /or compete?

Evaluate cooking trends. Scope Amazon and cookware shops. Is there a new item on the horizon that might need a cookbook to be sold alongside, like a panini-grill, a home smoker, a blow torch, or an ice cream maker? Are there any foods coming down the pipeline that might need recipes or merit further explanation? Soy, gluten-free, whole grains, and home-cooking are all popular right now. But what’s next? Hamburgers? Ceviche? Organic? A low-protein diet? What’s the next big thing?

3. Find An Agent

While it’s not imperative to have an agent, most editors and publishers give top-priority to proposals submitted by an agent. One editor told me she gets twenty proposals a day and frankly, doesn’t have the time to even look at most of them let alone respond. The best way to find an agent is to look at cookbooks that you like, check the acknowledgments, and take note of the agent. Then do some research to contact them with your proposal. Read query letter pet peeves from agents, to get a handle on how to approach one.

A good agent knows exactly where to send your proposal and is on good terms with the top editors. If an agent accepts to take you on, that means they can sell it or will try to, since no one wants to push something they don’t believe in. You may get passed over by an agent for no apparent reason (trust me on that one…) as they may have a similar proposal on their docket or another author working in the same genre. (Same with editors. You may simply get rejected based on the fact they have a book in print or in the pipeline on the same subject.)

Done right, with the help of an agent, your proposal can land on an editor’s desk the next day. A good agent will also help a writer shape that proposal and they handle on the contractual and legalese. Not that they have a crystal-ball into the future, but they do have their fingers on what’s selling and what’s not. As mentioned, you can sell a proposal without an agent but a good one will understand your concept and work on your behalf to get you’re your book sold. Finding an agent is one crucial part of the puzzle and in my opinion, one that’s important.

4. The Proposal

When I tell people I spent around eight months just working on just the proposal for my ice cream book, they’re shocked. But editors want to see a full and clear vision of what you’re going to write about. It’s especially true for a first-time author, but even for someone who’s written several books. Each book is a brand new project and requires a fresh start. And often the editors have to answer to higher-ups in marketing, sales, etc…and don’t, in general, have the last word.

Included in the proposal should be extensive samples of content, the tables of contents, recipe list and sample recipes if applicable, as well as a winning biography of you. And very importantly, a plan for how the book will sell once its published. Including as much as possible in there is a good idea, perhaps a sample chapter or two. But be careful: One editor told me she got a very good proposal but it was accompanied by some homemade cupcakes that were terrible and she found them, half-eaten, tossed in the trash of the employee break room where she left them for the staff. Not a good sign.

Most importantly, this is the time to give this your very best shot. Be concise and self-critical, and only send in your best effort. Editors are simply too busy to take the time to sift through a lot of material so your proposal should be, as they say, a “killer app.”

TIP: Publishers these days love numbers; Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter followers, as well as blog traffic. When you proposal lands at an editor, they need to “sell” the idea to the marketing team and nowadays those numbers have become important. They’re not vital, but the more followers that you have, the stronger your proposal will be. If you don’t have high numbers, don’t be discouraged. But an explanation of your social media and platforms will improve your position. If your numbers are low, explain how engaged with you those followers are. (Add proof, if you can.)

5. Give It Time

From the time you start writing down ideas, the proposal is written, the book sold, the book written and edited, and then printed and released, most books take much longer to come to fruition than people imagine. Plan on at least two years from the moment you start your quest until you see something tangible.

Most books have a one year lead time, which means you generally have a year to write the book. Then it can take another year to edit, re-test recipes, design and photograph the book. Finally, another year passes before the book is on the shelves.

6. Paying For It

Although it sounds tempting to live off your writing, for most writers, it ain’t their ship coming in. According to Dianne Jacob, in Will Write For Food, in her survey she notes a first-time author can expect to get a $5k-$25k advance.

But even if you get, let’s say, $50k, that might sound like a lot of money. So figure your agent gets 15%, the IRS gets 27%, plus figure $5k in expenses like food costs, printer cartridges (why are those things so darn expensive?), and equipment. And if you’re anything like me, you’ll go through a lot of pajama bottoms too, the preferred uniform of those who work at home. So that’s approximately $25,000 for a good 1-2 years of full-time work.

Most people who write books do something else to supplement their income: teach classes, lead tours, consult, have a restaurant or go to real jobs where they have to get dressed and leave the house for each day. Others marry rich. I’m not kidding.

7. Going Inside and Outside Your Blog

If you have a blog, use your blog to practice and refine what you do. Since anyone can start a blog, use yours to go out on a limb and write something outside your comfort zone.

If you’re used to writing recipes, for example, do a review of a product, visit a food producer, conduct an interview—whatever. Keep a theme going, but challenge yourself on occasion. If you want, keep your blog private and just use it for practice. Very few writers just start tapping a keyboard, or pick up a pen, and write something magnificent. I’m the exception. (Just kidding!) Most of good writing is editing. Step away, then come back to your writing. Or ask a friend who has good sensibilities, that you respect, to read what you wrote and get some feedback.

Another option is to use a writing coach. This can be money well spent if they get you motivated to write the book you want to write.

Note: If you’re going to ask someone for help, you should thank them properly. A lot of people give advice freely and graciously; I can’t even begin to thank those who helped me enough. But do take the time and have the courtesy to acknowledge the assistance of others. It’ll come back to you in spades and you’ll gain the respect and trust of others for acknowledging their contribution to your success.

8. Sell It

It all comes down to selling. There are lots of great ideas for cookbooks out there, but if you want to do a book, you need to have an idea that’s salable since most publishing houses are now owned by larger, global media corporations who are looking at the bottom line. But there are independents still out there that do superb cookbooks. See what’s out there, look at what publishing houses are releasing and what people are buying. Differentiate yourself from the pack if necessary, or go with the flow.

Say your book is all about making great salads. Great! Does the world need another book of salads? No. Do you have something extra to offer? Is there something special about your salads that make them different? Are you using a new product or vegetable to make those salads? If you do, that could be your hook.

People often want to publish treasured family recipes. If you are thinking along those lines, make sure to explain what makes your family special, and why are those recipes. Just because friends ask you for them, you need to explain in your proposal that ten- or twenty-five thousand other people will pay $30 for a book of them. Is your family from an ethnic group noted for something special (ie: Korean pickles, Swedish cordials, French dips, etc)? Is there something in your family’s culinary history that stands out?

Italian cooking is another popular topic. You may have a lot of great pasta recipes. But how does that make you different from the multitude of established (and already published) Italian cooking authors, like Faith Willinger or Marcella Hazan? Find what makes you different from the rest of the pack. Is it your take on it? Is it your personality? Are there techniques that are groundbreaking or truly exceptional that you can share?

9. Do It Yourself

If you want to write a book just for the fun of it, or to sell, there’s several places online to do-it-yourself and that can be a lot of fun if you have the pluck to do it yourself. In the past few years, many options have opened up, such as publishing an e-book through Amazon, Lulu.com, and Apple offers an iBooks Author publishing tool.

And there are apps for creating your own cookbook as well, such as Cookbook Cafe.

You don’t need to go through a traditional publisher and you have complete control over every aspect of the book, but self-published books need to find an audience so they sell best if you have some sort of outlet for sales, such as a blog or another medium. Another aspect is publicity. You won’t have a publishing house behind you pushing your book and making media contacts so you’ll need to take that on yourself. Still, no one’s as concerned about your book as you, and there are many self-published authors that sell tons of books on their own.

10. Do You Click?

In these cost-conscious times, if you have photographic skills, that can be a huge plus. Cookbook photography and styling is very expensive, costing $500 and up, per photo. So imagine the budget for a book with fifty, full-color professional photos. (And often the price of the book reflects that.)

If you are a good photographer, or are willing to learn, that can work to your advantage nowadays. If you can do a good job and save the publisher some money, that just might be a major plus in your favor during these cash-strapped times. Include samples in your proposal, but make sure they’re the very best you’re capable of doing.

Lastly, don’t be discouraged. Julia Child was rejected by almost every publishing house because Mastering the Art of French Cooking wasn’t considered a salable book. Later in life, another of her books was turned down, which became a huge success as well. The folks who wrote The Silver Palate Cookbook came up with the idea over drinks at home one night and had no idea what they were doing. But they took a risk, worked hard, and it paid off: They got the book they wanted, it met with great success, and the rest – as they say – is history.

This is just a general overview and there are lots more to consider if you want to write a cookbook. But I hope these questions and suggestions give you a good introduction to the process – good luck!


A few excellent books that I recommend are:

Will Write For Food,

-Recipes Into Type (out of print, but worth tracking down)

-The Recipe Writer’s Handbook


Related Posts and Links

5 Research Steps Before You Write Your Book Proposal (Jane Friedman)

Submission Requirements (Literary Agent Lisa Ekus)

Cookbook Boot Camp (Matt Lee and Ted Lee)

How to Write a Book Proposal (Jane Friedman)

So You Want to Publish a Cookbook (Justin Schwartz)

Before You Write that Cookbook (Cookbook Editor Susan Friedland)

From Blog to Book: How to Turn Your Ideas Into Reality (Chronicle Books)

How to Write a Nonfiction Book Proposal (Blogher)

How to Get a Cookbook Published (Andrea Nguyen of Viet World Kitchen)

Turn Your Blog Into a Book, Part I, and Part 2 (Gina Trapani of Lifehacker)

Chronicle Books’ submission guidelines as well as those from Ten Speed Press.

Five Secrets to Getting a Book Deal (Alan Rinzler)

Turning your blog into a book (Problogger)

So You Want to Write a Cookbook (Betterbaking.com)

How to write about food (Adam Roberts of The Amateur Gourmet)

Cookbook editor Justin Schwartz writes When is a cookbook deal too good to be true?

Media Bistro: Information and forums for authors & writers pitching ideas.

Modern Etiquette: Asking for a Favor (Design*Sponge)

Read how one man’s book became a #1 bestseller—even though it was turned down by 13 out of 14 publishers.

Questions & Answers with Dianne Jacob, writing coach and editor, about writing a cookbook.

Lulu.com and iUniverse both offer self-publishing and distribution options.

Tools and books: Resources I recommend for budding food writers.

The Making of My Paris Kitchen.

Q & A with Dianne Jacob: Will Write For Food

Dianne Jacob is one of the most seasoned food writers and editors around and has become quite well-known because of the excellent advice and guidance she’s generously been giving out to other writers. A journalist since 1978, Dianne is also a writing instructor and coach that helps aspiring authors hone their craft. You can read more about her work and read her articles at her website.

Her latest book, Will Write For Food, is a comprehensive guidebook to the world of food writing. I can’t say enough good things about this book and it’s the first place I send anyone who asks me about the nitty-gritty on what it takes to write about food; from how to write your first proposal to how much you can expect to make from the finished book.

With helpful tips from well-known chefs and food writers like Harold McGee, Alice Medrich, Amanda Hesser plus powerful literary agents and top-notch cookbook editors—Will Write For Food is a must read.

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David: Hi Dianne, thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for me and my readers. As someone who’s a seasoned writing coach and editor, what are the three most important tips you would give to aspiring food writers?

Dianne Jacob:

1. Win the lottery to make up for your income.

2. Take writing classes if you are cook; take cooking classes if you are a writer.

3. Be persistent.

David: Will Write For Food has become a classic, especially among food bloggers. But also amongst others interested in learning more about food writing, including restaurant reviewing, writing a memoir, and of course, cookbook writing. In fact, just about everyone I know has a copy.
What made you write it in the first place?

Dianne: I had been teaching food writing classes for years, and wanted a resource for my students. I couldn’t find one.

David: And was it difficult to find a publisher for the book?

Dianne: Are you kidding? Four New York publishers wanted it.

Continue Reading Q & A with Dianne Jacob: Will Write For Food…