Results tagged Paule Caillat from David Lebovitz

Paris Cooking Classes, Schools, and Wine Tastings

milk chocolate spatula

Many folks coming to Paris have asked about cooking classes on the non-professional level. Here’s a list of cooking programs offered around town. Some offer professional-level classes lasting a week or several months, while others are for dedicated home cooks where you can prepare a meal with a local cook in their Parisian kitchen and perhaps visit a market. Click on the links to find their scheduled classes and what language they’re taught in. (Note: This list was updated in December 2014.)

Because I haven’t gone to most of them I can’t offer personal recommendations. But a visit to their website should give you an idea of the nature of their classes. For professional-level classes outside of Paris, there’s a list below of those that specialize in pastry.

jam in tart

Cooking Classes in Paris

Atelier des Chefs

Atelier des Sens

Atelier Gastronomique de Alain Ducasse: The cooking school of super-chef Alain Ducasse

Cook ‘n With Class

Cordon Bleu

Cuisine Attitude by Cyril Lignac

Ecole Ferrandi: Paris’ school for professionals who want to cook, classes in English and French

Ecole Bellouet Conseil

Ecole Lenôtre: One-day classes for home cooks, and professional programs

Les Coulisses du Chef

Le Foodist

Chef Martial

Chez Bogato (Offers kids classes as well)

Cucina di Terresa: Organic & vegetarian cooking

La Belle Ecole

La Cuisine: English & French classes

L’Atelier de Fred

Gourmet Promenades: With Paule Caillat (in English)

La Cuisine de Marie Blanche

Ecole Escoffier: at the Ritz Carlton

On Rue Tatin with Susan Loomis: Classes in Paris & Normandy

Patricia Wells: Weeklong cooking programs


spatulas chocolate

Specialized Chocolate Classes For Professionals Outside of Paris

Ecole Chocolat

Pam Williams offers an online course in chocolate-making, with the option of coming to France (and Italy) and learning with selected professionals.

Chocolate Academy of Barry-Callebaut

Ecole du Grand Chocolat at Valrhona

Read about my visit to Valrhona’s Chocolate School

Ecole Nationale Supérieure de la Pâtisserie


Never An Empty Glass

Wine Tastings and Classes in Paris

Musée du Vin

Ecole du vin

David in Paris

Jacques Vivet’s Centre de Désgustation

Paris by Mouth Wine Tours

O-Château: Wine tasting in English with sommelier Oliver Magny and his excellent team of sommeliers.


Cheese Tastings and Classes in Paris


Check out my post: Cheese Tastings in Paris


Related Paris Posts

  • Paris Transit Options

  • Gluten-Free Eating in Paris

  • Paris Favorites

  • Paris Cooking Classes & Wine Tasting Programs

  • 10 Things to Do With Kids in Paris

  • 10 Delicious Things Not to Miss in Paris

  • Tipping in Paris

  • Romantic restaurants in Paris

  • Health Care Tips for Travelers to France

  • Where to Find the Best Steak Frites in Paris

  • Accessible Travel in Paris

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  • Paris Dining Blog Posts

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  • Paris Dining Guides

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  • Some Favorite Paris Restaurants

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  • Recommended Paris Guides

  • Gourmet Paris: What to Eat Where, Dish by Dish

  • Clotilde’s Edible Adventures in Paris

  • Pâtisseries in Paris

  • Hungry for Paris

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  • Markets of Paris

  • Eating and Drinking in Paris: French Menu Reader

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  • French Pear & Almond Tart Recipe

    french pear tart with cherries

    I’ve been living in France for almost eight years and in all that time, I’ve yet to make even one of these classic French pear tarts. I don’t think I’ve ever been in a bakery that didn’t have wedges of this tart in little paper footings, ready to take out and be consumed right away. So I guess because I could always buy one, why make it? But since I had a kilo of almond paste that I bought for another project, a batch of poached pears on hand, and an unbaked tart shell waiting it’s turn in my freezer, I decided to give one a go.

    This is a wonderful tart: pears fanned out in a golden-brown, buttery pastry shell that’s been spread with almond cream, then baked. And after I pulled this one out of the oven, I realized why it’s important to make this yourself; because it tastes amazing when still-warm from the oven, and you can use your own poached pears so you can vary the spices to your taste. (However you can use canned pear halves, which many of the French pastry shops do.)

    Aside from the almond paste, I also had a jar of quick-candied sour cherries on hand from another baking project (if it seems like I have a lot of baking odds and ends on hand, welcome to my world…), so I used them as well, which is something I haven’t seen in any French bakery. I’m thinking of suggesting they use them on my next visit.

    poached pears peartartb&w

    Continue Reading French Pear & Almond Tart Recipe…

    Paris Gastronomy Tour

    Doing a culinary tour in Paris is always fun, because not only do I get to meet some new people and make new friends (important…since the old ones keep deserting me), but I get to revisit my favorite places in Paris. And this week, we made a detour in Lyon as well. So there was a lot more to see, and eat…

    bernachon chocolates

    Lyon is a wonderful city. Kind of a miniature version of Paris, but younger, more spacious, and more relaxed. The people are plus cool, and in less of a rush—perhaps because they are so busy digesting all that rich food down there.

    thermometer dial chocolategrinder

    I’ve written about Bernachon before, and this trip, we had an especially warm greeting in their adjacent café, starting with puffy brioche and warmed pitchers of hot chocolate, made with the famed bean-to-bar chocolate that’s fabricated just a few doors away.

    brioche copper pots

    It’s no secret that I love Bernachon chocolate.

    Continue Reading Paris Gastronomy Tour…

    Paris Gastronomic Adventure: October 18-25, 2009

    Just announced—an all-new tour this fall! For one delicious week we’ll be feasting and tasting the best of France.

    macarons

    From extraordinary chocolate shops, to magnificent fromageries and bustling bouchons, this one-week adventure will be unforgettable! The itinerary is different than my Paris Chocolate Tours, so those of you who’ve traveled with me before, if you’re interested in coming along, we’d love to have you.

    For this trip, we’ll be focusing on some of the other tasty aspects of Paris, including…

    …visiting the best candy and pastry kitchens, and watch them dipping chocolates, piping macarons, and swirling sugar into edible confections.

    Continue Reading Paris Gastronomic Adventure: October 18-25, 2009…

    French Tart Dough Recipe

    tart dough

    I was in the middle of a lovely spring lunch at Chez Prune up by the Canal St. Martin the other day with Paule Caillat, a woman who teaches cooking classes here in Paris.

    We talked about many things, but of course, the conversation quickly turned to the most important subject of them all: baking. And soon she began to tell me about this tart dough recipe that she’s been making for years.

    I was expecting her to say, “You begin by taking some cold butter and work it into the flour.

    But she started by saying, “You take butter. And you take water. You put them in a bowl. Then you put it in the oven for 20 minutes and let everything boil until…” which, of course, stopped me mid-swallow of my Côte du Rhone. I almost started choking.

    “Surely, you jest!” I wanted to cry out in disbelief.

    Except I couldn’t, because I don’t know how to say that in French.

    Continue Reading French Tart Dough Recipe…

    Paris Favorites: Eating, Drinking and Shopping

    A number of folks consult the site for information about Paris, but it’s always best to get some second opinions. So I asked a few friends and in-the-know colleagues about their favorite places around the city, and I’m happy to share them with you.

    paris

    Included are links, when available, for complete addresses and additional contact information. Hours change and places close in Paris without notice so it’s best to call first before visiting. For restaurants and wine bars where food is served, reservations are strongly advised.

    If there any Paris favorites that you’d like to share, please feel free to do so in the comments. I’d love to hear about them.

    lucques olives


    Favorite Outdoor Market

    “Paris markets are one of my favorite subjects. I can go to the same market every day of the year and still always find something new. I regularly visit the boulevard Raspail market, a “regular” market Tuesday and Friday, organic (and expensive!) on Sunday. The fish merchants there are incredible on all days, and I adore the poultry people at the Tuesday and Friday market. I love testing one fish market or cheese stand against the other, grading them on each purchase. For 20 years I lived near the rue Poncelet market and still have a soft spot there, especially for Alléosse cheese and coffee beans from Brûlerie des Ternes.”

    “When I have time, I also love the President Wilson market on Wednesday and Saturday, where of course one finds the famed produce from Joël Thiebault but also wonderful fish, fresh crêpes, and Lebanese specialties. The market is near my dentist’s office so I always schedule a Wednesday morning appointment.”

    Patricia Wells, of Patricia Wells.com
    (Author: Bistro Cooking and The Paris Cookbook)

    Favorite Steak Tartare

    “As an American in France, getting into the French staple of steak tartare means getting past it’s resemblance to an uncooked hamburger patty. At Les Fines Gueules (2, rue la Vrillière, 1st) near place des Victoires they have cap-and-gowned the French standard by hand chopping Limousin beef (the best in France) and tossing the raw meat with white truffle oil, parmesan and sun dried tomatoes. Certainly not a traditional preparation, but an unbelievably delicious part of this American’s weekly diet.”

    Braden, of Hidden Kitchen

    Continue Reading Paris Favorites: Eating, Drinking and Shopping…