The Greenpoint Cocktail

A simple cocktail, riffing off the Brooklyn cocktail, as well as its other-borough cousins, the Bronx and the Manhattan, the Greenpoint boasts a double-dose of French inspiration and influences.

Like other New York-themed (and named) cocktails, the Greenpoint begins with a base of rye whiskey, bolstered by sweet red vermouth and yellow Chartreuse, the elusive liqueur that’s been made for hundreds of years in the French Alps. (Dolin vermouth, shown above, is made near Chartreuse in France.)

The good thing about this cocktail is that you can make it in a New York minute, stirring the ingredients together briskly until well-chilled, then straining it into a cocktail glass. While you might not be in Greenpoint, or Brooklyn, or in the alps of France, this cocktail is enjoyable no matter where you sip it.

The Greenpoint Cocktail
Print Recipe
1 cocktail
Be sure to use yellow Chartreuse for this cocktail, rather than green. The yellow is a little sweeter and provides just the right notes of honey to this iconic cocktail.
2 ounces rye whiskey
1/2 ounce yellow Chartreuse
1/2 ounce sweet vermouth
1 dash orange bitters
1 dash aromatic bitters, such as Angostura
orange twist, for garnish
1. Pour the rye whiskey, yellow Chartreuse, sweet vermouth, and both bitters into a cocktail mixing glass. Fill the glass two-thirds full of ice and stir briskly until well-chilled, about 15 seconds.
2. Strain into a chilled cocktail or coupe glass. Garnish with orange twist.

Drinking French

The Greenpoint Cocktail

7 comments

  • Mary
    June 14, 2020 6:21pm

    David- Thanks so much for helping get us through these difficult times. Your daily Apero Hour has been a bright spot not only for myself but for my very extended family. We have all purchased your new drinks book and sent copies to friends and family. We have followed you through the years with ice-cream making, chocolate, desserts, French cooking, French culture and French life. Thank you for sharing your experiences, recipes and skill. In this recent endeavor you have been most generous in welcoming us into your home, introducing us to Romain and sharing your friends, contacts, recipes. Thank you for introducing us to new (and old) French drinks.
    Merci bien.

  • Ranny
    June 14, 2020 8:25pm

    David, it truly has been a pleasure to watch every evening during this time of home sheltering. You are such a delight and so generous to share your time in this way. Hats off to Ramon for sharing his French lifestyle tips also.

  • Martha
    June 14, 2020 8:34pm

    OK, David, You do know that NYC gas five boroughs, don’t you? How about an homage cocktail for that greenest, largest and most international borough, my beloved Queens!

    • Jamie
      June 14, 2020 8:48pm

      Martha, a classic cocktail already exists for Queens.

      1.5 oz dry gin
      0.5 oz dry vermouth
      0.5 to 0.75 sweet Vermouth
      1 oz Pineapple Juice

  • Lalo
    June 15, 2020 12:08am

    Here is another variation on the Green Point cocktail, David, that I find much more interesting and not so over the top sweet.

    2 ounces rye whiskey
    1/2 ounce green Chartreuse
    1/2 ounce Punt e Mes vermouth
    1 dash orange bitters
    1 dash Angostura
    orange twist, for garnish

    (I sometimes up the Chartreuse and vermouth to 3/4 oz. each, depending on the weather and mood)

    • June 15, 2020 9:25am
      David Lebovitz

      Thanks for chiming in. That seems to be close the same recipe but with green Chartreuse instead of yellow, and another red vermouth. (Italian red vermouths can be quite sweet and fruity but Punt e mes leans toward the bitter side. Dolin, which I use, tends to be quite herbaceous.) I love bitter cocktails but to my taste the yellow Chartreuse is the right balance but thanks for sharing your version :)

      • Jonathan W
        January 3, 2021 5:56pm

        I used to think of yellow chartreuse as too sweet, and I made this recipe for months using green, until I finally decided to try it your way, David. Hands down much better–the only thing I do differently (not sure if it’s a big change?) is to use just a splash of Campari instead of bitters. I also use just a *hair* more than 0.5oz of the chartreuse. It’s my favorite nightcap now.

A

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