Inside The KitchenAid Factory

mixer melange

“You’re going to flip out.”That was the message I got from a representative and friend from KitchenAid when he found out I was finally going to visit their factory. It was a visit I’ve been waiting years to make.

I’d been meaning to visit the KitchenAid factory ever they brought up the idea to me a few years ago, asking me to give a baking demonstration there as well. I can’t imagine life without my KitchenAid mixer and most other bakers I know feel the same way (and I love seeing how things are made, anything. I just find it fascinating, no matter what I’m watching being put-together.)

And if you have a KitchenAid mixer, you know what I’m talking about. It’s without a doubt the one essential tool that most home bakers can’t live without. The mixer we used at Chez Panisse was a solid performer after twenty years of hard restaurant use (it outlasted me!) and my personal mixer has been in service for well over 15 years. When I began doing baking demonstrations over a decade ago, I was so enthusiastic that I reached my arms around the one that I was using and gave it a big, generous hug.

Word of that hug reached KitchenAid headquarters and ever since then, I’ve been lucky to get to know many of the terrific folks who work for KitchenAid, both in the United States and Europe. And when they heard I was heading to the US this month, we worked in a date to visit their factory for a private look at how the mixers are put together. They gave me special permission to take photographs so much of what you’ll see here was generously allowed by KitchenAid.

A visit to the factory begins with a viewing of some of the classic stand mixers. The first produced was the Model H, introduced in 1919 and sold until 1927. It weighed a hefty 60-pounds and stores were so skeptical of its saleability that it was lugged door-to-door by housewives, hoping to convince other homemakers of its value.
The price? The Model H sold back then for $199 which is the equivalent today of about $1400.

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The First Ever KitchenAid Mixer


Over the next several decades the designs changed to reflect the times, with my favorite being this one, totally streamlined with swoops and curvilinear lines, suggesting speed and industrialism. Someday I hope this one is re-issued as a Special-Edition, since I think it’s the most beautiful of all the models ever produced.

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I love the graceful curve of the (useful) handle, which you grasp to lift the head of the machine. And I love the little ‘fin’ that’s affixed to the back.

Others models were made of materials strong enough to withstand the rugged KitchenAid motor within.

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There were contemporary mixers on display too, including custom models made to commemorate certain events, including this one. One hundred of them were made and donated as thank-you gestures to the New York City Fire Departments for their efforts and heroism after September 11th.

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Another 100 were made later and sold on eBay, with the proceeds going to 9/11 charities.

I learned that KitchenAid is the only company in America which still makes counter top appliances in the United States. All others brands are made overseas, although a few select KitchenAid appliances like the heavy-duty Pro-Line Espresso Maker (which I seriously envy) is made in Italy. Each and every KitchenAid appliance manufactured out of the United States is taken out of the box, vigorously-tested, then re-sealed before it’s ready for sale.

color samples at kitchenaid

The first thing that I saw when I entered the factory are the newest models and colored mixers lined up, practically floor-to-ceiling! They ranged in hues like sunny Meyer Lemon, Martha Green (named after…), Caviar (black with silver flecks), a cheerful Green Apple, Olive, and colorfully-red Bing Cherry.

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Mixers Ready To Be Dipped in Paint

If I didn’t already own several mixers, I would have tried to sneak out the brilliant-yellow Meyer Lemon model under my jacket, although it’s being considered for retirement. New colors are constantly introduced, then retired, sop that new ones can be added. So if you ever see a color that you like, get it while it’s hot. One enduring color that’s been offered for years, with a new expanded product line, is the pink mixer, with 10% from the sale of each going to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. There’s no plans to retire that one, and in fact, they’ve added other products in that color range.

mixer assembly line

Each KitchenAid mixer takes about one-day to assemble. The actual building of the mixer is done in several stages: The engines are assembled and installed in the cast-metal housing by one team, the parts are heavily oiled (using three-times the amount of lubrication required for a lifetime of use), then sealed tight by another group, then the mixers are tested in another area, replicating 30 years of normal home use. Once they pass inspection, they’re packaged up and ready to be shipped off.

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Blenders Are Tested With Cubes of Ice, Which Are Perhaps the Hardest Things You’d Put In a Blender.

Each person in the factory makes an average of 92 standing mixers per day, with 22 people working on the line at any given time. Christmas starts in June at KitchenAid, when temporary workers are hired to assemble mixers to meet the upcoming holiday demand.

I left my resumé.

kitchenaid

One of the newest improvements to the KitchenAid standing mixer is their sturdiest whip yet. Unlike the dough hook and paddle attachments, the whip has several different parts affixed together, making it the part that takes the most abuse (sometimes I think I know exactly how it feels.) I watched how each individual whip was spun around while a woman patiently threaded each wire, interlacing them and securing them to the core.

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A Woman Wields Her Whip


The happiest folks in the factory are not on the floor, but in a special, plusher chamber. These are the “call girls”, as they’re known. These happy cookers spend their days servicing clients, tirelessly, one right after the other. They’re the on-site customer service team, helping customers seeking advice about their appliances. Although the main call center is elsewhere (in Michigan), KitchenAid likes some of their customer service workers to remain in the factory, keeping them in touch with the manufacturing process, so they can respond to requests quickly and accurately.

So when you call KitchenAid, you can ask to speak to someone in the factory in Greenville. You’ll get connected to one of the highly knowledgeable service team members there (…and tell them I sent you…they’re not likely to forget me!)

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Is your mixer making a funny sound?
Hold the phone to the machine while it’s operating and they can diagnose it for you.
Wondering how you can raise the bowl so that the whip reaches the absolute bottom of it?
There’s a tiny screw located underneath the mixer head that you can turn counterclockwise (on the K5) that’ll do the trick. I’ve been using my KitchenAid mixer for years and never knew that.
Of course if I had read the instructions…and we all read instruction manuals, don’t we?

Just a short ride away is the KitchenAid Experience, an interactive center where everything that KitchenAid makes is available to try out and play around with.

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How Do You Decide?

There’s also a teaching kitchen with demonstrations throughout the day. I did one, making all sorts of chocolate treats for guests, including chewy Chocolate Financiers, Rocky Road with Homemade Marshmallows, Peanuts, and Cocoa Nibs, and Double Chocolate Ice Cream with Stracciatella, using the brand-new ice cream attachment, which works with all KitchenAid standing mixers.

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Homemade Rocky Road, Recipe From The Great Book of Chocolate


Each and every appliance is available on the floor to play around with and bargain-hunters should descend to the lower-level, a room packed floor-to-ceiling with factory refurbished mixers and blenders.

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When a KitchenAid product is returned to a store, it’s sent back to the factory. The box is opened, the appliance removed and thoroughly inspected and tested. Then it’s re-sealed and offered for sale at a substantial discount: Each appliance meets the same rigorous standards as a spanking-new model.

I saw hyper-powerful 6-quart KitchenAid mixers available for slightly more than $200 and chrome blenders being sold for less than half the retail price. And there was lots and lots of mixers and other appliances in colors that had been retired or in various experimental finishes that you won’t find anywhere else.
If you can’t make it to the KitchenAid Experience, you can shop find your own bargain on a reconditioned model at Amazon.

Big thanks to the staff at KitchenAid for taking the time to show my everything, as I poked through boxes and rifled through bins of parts. They answered all my questions and I’ll never rev up my KitchenAid standing mixer again without thinking of what went into it before it became a fixture in my kitchen and my life.

Related Links:

Bargain KitchenAid Mixers & Appliances

You can find amazing bargains on reconditioned KitchenAid appliances at Amazon, such as powerful K5 mixers for only $129, and gorgeous chrome-plated blenders for only $39, which will save you hundreds of dollars.

The KitchenAid Experience

The KitchenAid Experience is located in Greenville, Ohio, about 45 minutes from Dayton and 2 hours from Cinncinati.

The KitchenAid Experience
423 South Broadway
Greenville, Ohio
Tel: 1-888-886-8318

Factory Tours of KitchenAid

KitchenAid
1701 KitchenAid Way
Greenville, Ohio
Tours given Monday through Friday, at 10am and 1pm (subject to change, so call ahead.)

Local Bed & Breakfast

St. Clair Place
224 E. Third Street
Greenville, Ohio
Email: stclairplace@earthlink.net

110V-220V, and International Questions

Will my KitchenAid Mixer Work Abroad?

KitchenAid International

60 comments

  • Wow fun! I have an orange one right now and feel tempted by the newest green apple you mentioned!

  • Thank you for sharing your experience. How cool!

  • David, what an AMAZING post! You’re completely right – KitchenAid mixers are undoubtably one of the most important things in a kitchen. It’s just so impressive to realize that there is a product still out there that stands for quality and is meant to last. It seems almost rare I think!

    I have to read this post again from beginning to end…. it’s not just informative but such a great example of doing something right.

    YAY FOR KITCHENAID!!!!!!!!

  • I sing the praises of my KitchenAid constantly! Excellent and informative post. I never knew the joy of the KitchenAid until my best friend surprised me with one for Christmas last year. *sniff* My life (and my shoulder muscles) has never been the same!

    Soooo, perhaps some KitchenAid-specific recipes to come soon?

  • David,

    Thanks so much for the tour! And thanks for answering my question about how to get the attachment to reach to the bottom of the bowl. I’ve had my mixer for almost 4 years and didn’t know that either!

  • Choosing the color of my 5qt was hands down one of the hardest choices I have ever made. How fun (I’m sooooo jealous). The most quotable bit has to have been “A Woman Wields Her Whip.”

  • Do you prefer lifting the head or lowering the bowl?

  • I want to run right home and give my (cherry red) Kitchen Aid a hug after reading this. And then I want to find that crafty little screw. Who knew?

  • I’ve had my KitchenAid a dozen years or so and I had no idea that you could adjust the height of the bowl!!! That had always vexed me. So after reading your post, I went and made the necessary adjustments. Et voilà! Perfection achieved. I think I’ll sleep better tonight. Thank you, David. Have fun in Texas.

  • David,

    The trouble with buying a new appliance because of its reputation for long life is you don’t know if the new ones are as good as the old ones. My KA is only eight years old, but my Cuisinart is almost 30 and, as much as I’d like a new one with a larger bowl and buttons, I’m afraid it wouldn’t last me 30 years.[deep sigh]

  • My color: Sorbet
    Color I wish I had: Alton Brown’s Flames

    Out of this whole post, the info about the refurbished mixers is very valuable. I would not hesitate to recommend now a factory refurb to friends and family. Thanks, David!

  • So cool. Loved the factory visit.

    My British racing green kitchenaid and I are as one being.

  • I don’t have one yet, but I wonder which one would be right for a home-amateur cook like me… I’ll speak with those ladies out there!

  • OMG OMG OMG. I remember when you were talking (boasting?) about your impending Kitchen Aid trip as long ago as last year. Forget “Martha Green” – where is your “Dandy David” custom-built mixer? And the tip about raising the bowl – does that mean I really can just whip a solo egg white instead of having to put 2 in the mix?! And an ice cream maker too. Oh, tiddley, tum-tum, working as much OT as I am means maybe I can afford some of these babies to attach to my tangerine dream.

    great post.
    Loved it!
    xx

  • You LUCKY skunk! How envious I am.
    (Maybe I should also have spent the last decades being a baker and getting famous for it.)

  • I don’t know how I’d cope without my KitchenAid.

    I have to say I’ve become somewhat addicted to the seemingly endless list of attachments for it. I already have the meat grinder, pasta roller, and juicer, and every time I find myself in a kitchenware store I inevitably find myself ogling the ones I don’t have. For some reason, I’ve been pining for the ice cream maker attachement lately, even though I already own an ice cream maker.

    Thanks for the wonderful post.

  • Sorry, maybe my messages are not interesting but you are the only blogger that not welcome my comments. That was my second.. i bloghop find so many interesting people.. thought you are, but sorry to find your blog.. just want to express my opinion.
    Au revoir et bon chance!

  • Béa: If I didn’t already have too many mixers (is that possible?) the green one would be on my countertop right now.

    Ivonne, Lisa, Sam, and Brett: I know, that little screw. Who knew? They need to get the word out on that one a little better.

    Lindy: British racing green? I didn’t know there was an Austin Power’s model?

    Relly: I welcome all comments (well, except for the one that called me an asshole). Sorry they didn’t come through and get posted.

    Jeff: KitchenAid used to have a program, “Make Your Own Mixer” and they would customize one however you wanted. Unfortunately they discontinued that program just prior to my arrival. I hope they didn’t do it on purpose!

    Rob: I have lots of attachments but I haven’t played around with them as much as I should. When I get back to Paris, I’m promised them at KitchenAid I’m make more pasta, since they told me that’s the best of the attachments (I did play with the ice cream makers a bit too.)

    Sil: Yes, those women can help you figure out which model is best. I prefer the K5, which I adore, but the K4 with the tilt head is more economical (although check the refurbished ones, they sell them on Amazon.com as well. But do check the warranty, which may be different for refurbished models.

    Kevin: My first KitchenAid is about 15-20 years old and works just the same as the one I got last year in France (I had to get a new one since the voltage is different.)

    Judith: Just remember what they say (or what we say)…bakers are rolling dough, not rolling IN dough.

    B: I’m a K5 kinda guy, so I like the bowl that goes up-and-down. I think it’s whatever you’re used to. The K5′s are becoming harder to get, so if you want one, you may want to make the plunge soon.

  • David, can’t wait till you come back and can whip me up another batch of that rocky road. Its Mm Mm good.
    I mean Miam Miam.
    P.S. I dont have a kitchenaid mixer. I feel like such a dork.

  • David, this was a fascinating post. Alas, I too am one of the mixer-less pariahs of the blogosphere. I’ve come close to biting the bullet and purchasing one on several occasions, but not only do they cost about twice as much here as in the US, but the only model available seems to be the ‘artisan’. I sometimes torture myself by looking at refurbished prices for the professional series on amazon.com, and dream of how wonderful my life would be if I lived stateside. But you don’t either, so I’m wondering: assuming you have one in Paris, did you buy it in France or bring it from the US, and if the latter, do they work on European voltage? Would it not be completely insane to think of lugging one back with me next time I go?

  • Awesome. Absolutely love the first photo. Thanks for the virtual tour!

  • I am privileged to have a Kitchenaid Millenium Mixer. It is a Limited Edition Mixer made in 2000 of the Model KSM5. What is really cool about it is that it came with an extra bowl with my name engraved on it.

  • I actually do . . . hug my K4. I admit it. I still call my mom to thank her for it after several years now. Thanks for the virtual tour. I live in a small house with little storage, so I’ve resisted attachments, KitchenAid ones, that is. I even have just one bowl! A true pain when working with egg whites. BUT, now I see after getting another bowl, I must get the ice cream attachment. No, the pasta attachment. Ice cream. Pasta. Ice cream . . .

    The screw tip for raising the bowl is fabulous. Thanks.

  • that sounds so interesting!
    i drooled over the picture of the rocky road

  • David, I have sent my kid here and she also wants to know how come you aren’t fat. So, I went to their store site, great stuff, all eager for a gorgeous apple green mixer, but oops! I live in Italy, so I go to that site and THEY HAVE ONLY ONE MIXER AND NO ATTACHMENTS!
    How can this be? J Louise, I cook more than 80% of USians, and can’t get the super wonderful with the ice cream maker and meat grinder?

  • The US models of the mixers are different from the Europeans ones in that the EU regulations requires a safety switch of some sort, which prevents some of the attachments from being compatable with the European models.

    If it’s any consolation, I share your pain: I want the ice cream attachment too!

  • still saving up some money to buy the KitchenAid… in “MintJulep” or “Cinnamon” .

  • David, this is a great post! How fascinating and informative, and yes, I’m wildly jealous.

    I have not taken the KitchenAid plunge yet, though I’ve lusted after them low these many years. I wrote a blog post about KitchenAid lust back in February and it seems there are many of us out here, jealously eyeing our friends’ mixers, secretly fondling them in the department store (and I’m not even a baker!).

    Ah, someday. And hearing what a great company it is, I’ll feel much better about making the investment. I’m looking forward to one in cherry red.

    Your blog is wonderful. Thanks!

  • Cold comfort, although I suppose I could get my kid to lug one over for me and put it on a transformer. It would sure cut down on her beach wardrobe, though.

  • Oh, wow! That looks like the coolest tour ever!

    Had I not been given a KitchenAid as a gift, I was going to buy the Komen model for myself. (I do the Race for the Cure every year, so I like to do everything I can to support them.)

    Oh, and I got the ice cream attachment for Christmas, this past year! It’s just so sad that I have not had the chance to use it. (I need to use up more stuff in my freezer, apparently, as the instructions call for the bowl attachment to be stuffed in there, overnight…)

  • What fun! I’m another one who will appreciate that screw-turn tip if it applies to my model – ever since we got a replacement whip (through some recall program) some years back, it hasn’t reached the bottom of the bowl. And it turns out we’re not too far from the factory – maybe we should make a weekend trip: we’d all enjoy the factory tour and then I could subject my boys to The Kitchenaid Experience store… :^)

  • Wow. I just went over to give my twenty-year-old Kithcenaid mixer a kiss. Wish they came in red back then.

  • “I can not live with my KitchenAid mixer” — might want to correct that. ;)

  • Sniff…sniff.. I want one!!!

  • SO envious of your visit! I am a proud new owner of a fire engine red KA which I’ve named Babe. I coveted her for so long, I almost fell over when my hubby gave her to me. Of course this was just before our move from London to Singapore! She ain’t heavy, she’s my KA! Thankfully Singapore is on the same voltage. Looking forward to more KitchenAid recipes…

  • SO envious of your visit! I am a proud new owner of a fire engine red KA which I’ve named Babe. I coveted her for so long, I almost fell over when my hubby gave her to me. Of course this was just before our move from London to Singapore! She ain’t heavy, she’s my KA! Thankfully Singapore is on the same voltage. Looking forward to more KitchenAid recipes…

  • I am so glad I found this post!

    Fascinating.

    I have my granny’s KA. I am 34. So this one I have is older than that. I really need to get a new plug for it bc this one is that old fashioned rubber and does not look all that safe.

    BUT. the machine works great. It is much smaller than the big ones they make now. And of course it is in old fashioned white.

  • I live about 25 minutes away from the Kitchen Aid factory. I can’t believe I have never gone for a tour. That is now on my list of things to do. I have a classic white Kitchen Aid mixer, a wedding gift from my mother in law. I absolutely love it. Thanks for the virtual tour. It was wonderful.

  • If Judith really wants a kitchenaid she can probably have one but that might have to be one present for the whole year.

    And I still can’t make up my mind which one to get. The factory tour sounds really fun.

  • Hello,
    When I was a child, just after the depression, my grandparents had a small specialty bakery in Portland, Oregon, and owned several Hobart (Kitchen Aid) mixers. My mother inherited one of these and, since it had been used steadily for years and years, wrote to the Hobart Company to inquire about having the motor reconditioned. The company was interested in acquiring that mixer and offered my mother one of the newest (top-of-the-line) mixers, which she accepted. So, you have probably seen amid the mixer collection, my grandparents’ appliance.

    I remember, at a very active age 5, my grandmother sitting me on a high stool in the bakery and putting an icing rosebud on each finger tip — to keep me busy and out of harm’s way. Of course, my dilemma was whether or not to eat the icing or just look at the pretty flowers. Decisions, decisions.

  • Is it wrong to covet the pretty colors when I already have a white refurbished model that hs served me well for 8 years?
    I got mine as a gift from my parents when I decided to go to cooking school. And then I decided not to go! At least they let me keep the KitchenAid.

  • I coveted the flamed out KitchenAid mixer but didn’t want to spend the $150 for airbrush. So after 2 years I came up with a onesizefitsall decal for around $20. Now I am up to 4 different sytles. But since I burned up 3 under warranty, so went my flames, but they are cheap enough for a replacement. I wonder who got them refurbed?
    http://www.flameka.com

  • Por favor, quisiera saber los precios de las mezcladoras para reposteria

  • hi; can you tell me the year that the kitchen aid mixer with the handle showing in the second picture above was made. I have one but i do not know the year it was made. my son love the mixer so much ,just like you he would like to see it re-issue again as a special edition. Thank you.

  • I bought my K-5A Kitchen -Aid mixer over 40 years ago. It is still running perfectly. One can not say that for anything built today. I have been asked many times if I would care to sell it and my answer is always the same, “never”. Thanks for producing such a wonderful product.

  • I bought my K-5A Kitchen -Aid mixer over 40 years ago. It is still running perfectly. One can not say that for anything built today. I have been asked many times if I would care to sell it and my answer is always the same, “never”. I am very pleased that kitchen aid has produced such a wonderful product.

  • I bought my K-5A Kitchen -Aid mixer over 40 years ago. It is still running perfectly. One can not say that for anything built today. I have been asked many times if I would care to sell it and my answer is always the same, “never”. I am very pleased that kitchen aid has produced such a wonderful product.

  • I saw your great Blog about Kitchen Aid mixer when I was looking for somewhere to purchase that small silver plug which goes in the front of the mixer. I have an older model with a glass bowl that was given to me a few years back when I moved from my home town of Troy, Ohio. After tons of cleaner and and a little elbow grease I uncovered that my Kitchen Aid was imprinted with … Made by The Hobart MFG. Troy, Ohio. I knew Hobarts made them but this just gave a more special meaning for that old mixer. Although my husband would love to have a big bright new one … I just tell him yeah if mine ever breaks I’ll consider it! HA … I don’t think I’ll have to worry. Especially now that he has discovered that it accepts the new attachments. This is when we realized that the silver dot on the front had been replaced with a make shift silver button. Does any one know if you can buy a replacement? We go to Ohio often and might have to stop in the Experience Store and find out.

  • This is a great post…
    I treasure my plain-Jane white Kitchen Aid,
    but have always coveted Alton Brown’s matt grey model with
    shooting red-orange-yellow flames.
    Did they have any of those for sale…?
    (I am guessing…ahhh…no…)

  • Thérèse-Marie: Although that was probably a custom model, there’s a few companies that can make your KitchenAid flaming!

    Check out my post: Five KitchenAid Hacks

  • I want to know where do I buy parts for mixers?

    Contact KitchenAid Customer Service and they can help you. There’s also lots of online companies which sell parts, too. -dl

  • I’m so ridiculously jealous of how cheap KitchenAids are in the US… my ex bought a refurbished one from Amazon and I loved it dearly, and wish I could’ve found a way to stash it in my luggage on my return to Australia (because it probably just sits in his cupboard, unappreciated and unused – which, I feel, is sacreligious!).

    As yet, I haven’t found them for under $600 in Australia – sometimes they’re a lot more. I’m seriously considering getting one in the US and buying a transformer to go with it, just so I can have one.

  • Thank you for your tidbit on how to adjust the screw under the mixer head. I’ve had my KA stand mixer for 5 years and let it sit in the pantry most of this time because I thought it was not all it was hyped up to be, or defective, or I just didn’t know how to use it. Tightening the screw actually lowered the whip (not raised the bowl) so I’m guessing it’s because it’s not a K5. Either way, it worked! … and now I’m off to whip up a batch of something! :) Thanks again.

  • Great article. I had dreamed of owning a KitchenAid stand mixer for years. As I have problems with my wrists the constant kneading & mixing of baking (which I love) would often limit me in what I could do. My wonderful husband bought me one of the Pro 600 series as a very BIG surprise Christmas gift before he deployed last November. No more wrist problems inhibiting my baking dreams! I absolutely love Pearl (yes, I named it). She is “ginormous”, but that just let’s me do that much more! When he was home on R&R earlier this month he gave me the pasta attachements for a birthday present plus the heaviest, shiniest food processor I’ve ever seen (KitchenAid of course – named it Ossie). Needless to say my husband is AWESOME!!! I plan on giving homemade pasta, breads & other treats as some of my Christmas gifts this year. I also just bought my sister a green apple Artisan for Christmas – she’s going to be so stoked! Never had a reason to visit Ohio until now – will have to mention the factory to hubby for a trip in the future :)

  • I have a white K5 given to me by wonderful friends who had “a spare one in the basement!” Since it weighs almost 30 pounds, getting it out and onto the counter had become difficult. Recently, my clever contractor created a wall of oak cabinets in my home office/pantry from a wall-sized entertainment center he found at a local antique mall. We turned the former TV cabinet into a handy mixer garage by installing a rolling floor and an outlet inside it. Now to use my wonderful toy, I open the doors, pull out the shelf, lock it in place, and voila. I am set to go without straining my poor back. Life is good.

  • Help!!! I am frantic. Christmas is coming up, and my big mixer is on the blink. I think a gear is stripped. I can’t seem to locate a repair place in the Humble, Texas area, and I am frantic. Don’t know what I ever did without it. Can you please give me some locations near zip code 77339?

    Thanks. I would have one of each color if I had room for them. I love my big mixer.

  • My advice would be to contact the KitchenAid Customer Service Center directly, as they are best equipped to advise on repairs.

  • Hi David,

    I am a student in the Home Products Development major at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. I am currently working on a project where I have to research manufacturing process of a KitchenAid Stand Mixer. I’ve been on the website and have called the Experience Center in Ohio but have not been able to get in touch with an actual person that can help me from the plant. I was wondering if you could put me in contact with someone that can help. Or if you had any information you can send me that would be great as well. I would really appreciate it. Thank you so much in advance!

  • Hi I live in Australia and I was wondering how I can purchase one of the refurbished stand mixers with the right power cord for Australian electricity. thanks

  • Michelle: Please contact your local KitchenAid representative using this link: KitchenAid International.