Fresh little cornichons ready for pickling, at the market: (And no, this photo has nothing to do with someone’s Speedo comment…)

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Kig ha Farz

When you think of ‘take-out’, France perhaps isn’t the first culture that comes to mind. The concept to me seems so American; pick up the phone or walk to the corner, grab something to eat, bring it home and eat it in front of the television. Nice and quick…and no dishes! In spite of what you might think, France has plenty of take-out food shops,…

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Of all the regions in France, one of the most peculiar is Brittany. The cuisine is hearty, earthy, and dynamic – like the terrain. The coastline is a virtual lunar landscape of jutting rock formations, with pristine beaches (with somewhat frosty water) tucked in between them. Consequently, upper Brittany is somewhat remote and not a popular tourist destination. Most of my days begin at an…

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I’ve been thinking about this for quite a while, and figured I’d ask “Is it just me?…What would you do?” Let’s say you’ve been invited to someone’s house for dinner. Yum. You arrive and they’re preparing the food. There’s piles of fresh produce and meat on the counter, ready to be whipped up into something magical and tasty. Vibrant tomatoes, leafy greens, juicy meat ready…

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The French predilection of blowing things out of proportion is nowhere more evident than in the highly detailed, extraordinary Michelin maps, which cover every nook, cranny, crevice and petit village in France. And like many things French, once you figure out how to work within the ‘system’, in this case an unwieldingly large map that’s impossible to unfurl in the car, it works better than…

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Back to Paris, after 10 days in the summer sun (and occasional drizzle) of Brittany. I’ve had enough butter to last me quite a while, in buttery buckwheat crêpes, buttery caramelized Kouign Amann, butter-rich Far Breton, and Kik ha farz…drizzled with butter. In the next few days, between exercising, I’ll be adding photos and stories about all the treats… Driving home with caramel sucettes made…

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These are pêche plat, or ‘flat peaches’…for obvious reasons! They’re white-fleshed little peaches with tiny pits and are grown in the US as well, where they’re often called Donut® or Saturn peaches. Last week in Paris I saw flat nectarines. Is this a trend? What’s next…flat watermelons? Flat blueberries? These are the best fruit in the world: Reine Claude plums. Don’t let the dull green…

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1. You buy clothing, not based on style or fashion, but because the texture and color of the fabric will make new and interesting backgrounds for your food shots. 2. You choose routes through town based on what’s to eat or photograph along the way in lieu of the most direct path. 3. You find the only friends that’ll talk to you are other food…

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A favorite late summer treat in France is the Pêche de Vigne, or ‘peach of the grapevine’. These fuzzy heirloom peaches have a dull, very fuzzy dusky exterior that gives little clue to the dazzling flesh within. But slice one open, and…wow! The rare Pêche de Vigne appears only for a short time; just during the fleeting, final weeks in August. Their taste is a…

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