Results tagged New York City from David Lebovitz

This Friday, I’ll be in conversation with award-winning writer Michael Ruhlman at Archestratus books in Brooklyn on November 1st, from 6:30 to 8:30 to celebrate the release of his new book, From Scratch. Michael’s opus to home cooking extols the virtues of mastering basic cooking techniques, which means doable recipes for the perfect roast chicken, as well as traditional cassoulet, the ultimate BLT (with home-cured…

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On Wednesday, October 30th, I’ll be in conversation with Brad Thomas Parsons for his brand new book, Last Call: Bartenders and Their Final Drink and the Wisdom and Rituals of Closing Time. Brad is the James Beard award-winning author of Bitter and Amaro, and we’ll be talking about his spirited writing, cocktail culture, as well as taking questions. And yes…there will be Negronis* for all!

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  Here’s a round-up of places I visited recently in New York City. One happy change (which is also happening in cities elsewhere) is the proliferation of excellent bakeries making top-quality artisan bread, as well as bakeries with a global focus. While Americans don’t buy bread daily, as the French do, you can get terrific bread and pastries if you know where to look. Restaurants…

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Who knew there was a cheese aging cave in bustling New York City? New York City is known for a lot of things, but aging cheese isn’t one of them. At least I didn’t think so. Crown Finish Caves is in a former Budweiser brewery, in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. The building had been dormant since 1914 (the railroad tracks that brought ingredients to the brewery,…

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To celebrate the release of the paperback edition of L’Appart, I’ll be at Shakespeare & Co. at 939 Lexington Avenue (between 68th and 69th Streets) in New York City on Tuesday, November 13th, from 6:30 to 8pm. I’ll be in conversation with Justin Spring, author of The Gourmands’ Way: Six Americans in Paris and the Birth of a New Gastronomy. We’ll be taking questions, as…

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{UPDATE: Bistro Pierre Lapin has closed.] People are impressed with (and a little envious of) the French and their relationship to food, especially a meal. So much so that UNESCO added the gastronomic meal of the French to their list of Intangible Cultural Heritage designations. The gathering around the table to eat is something most cultures engage in, of course, but it seems to carry special…

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I’m always interested in ice cream, no matter where it’s from. But probably the most intriguing one I’ve ever come across was booza, an ice cream thickened, not with eggs or cornstarch, but with sahleb and mastic. Republic of Booza was opened by Jilbert El-Zmetr and Michael Sadler, along with two business partners, in Brooklyn, New York, bringing this ice cream stateside. Jilbert owned a booza…

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During a recent trip to Iceland, I visited a number of bakeries which make what are considered to be in the Danish tradition. They’re yeasted, but get their flaky layers by either being rolled and folded several times, or made with a brioche-like dough, often with a moist, sweet marzipan filling. I met Uri Scheft, an Israeli baker whose parents emigrated from Denmark, at his bakery…

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Coming up, I’ll be doing two events in New York City. At both I’ll be signing books, and you can take care of some of that holiday shopping. Come say hi! On Saturday, December 5th, the fine folks at The Brooklyn Kitchen (100 Frost Street, Brooklyn) will be hosting a get-together and booksigning at their store. Copies of The Sweet Life in Paris, Ready for Dessert,…

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