Brown Bread Ice Cream

brown bread ice cream

When I was in Ireland, after a wonderful dinner at an old country inn, I was served a big bowl of Brown Bread Ice Cream. I had heard about this unusual ice cream quite a while back and like Grape-Nuts Ice Cream, which is something apparently enjoyed in New England (although I was born and live there for eighteen years and never saw or tasted even a lick of it), I was intrigued by the idea of bits of dark crunchies embedded in scoops of cool, creamy ice cream.

One bite, of course, and I was hooked and wanted to make it when I got home. I wasn’t quite sure how to go about it, and I sent a message to the inn inquiring about the process, but after a few weeks of checking my Inbox every three minutes, I just couldn’t wait any longer and decided to come up with one on my own.

Fortunately, around the same time, a copy of Tartine Bread landed in my mailbox from the publisher, and I was completely blown away at what a beautiful book it was.

brown bread pieces blog

I’m not a bread baker, although I appreciated the gorgeous photos of the rustic breads, but I was especially fixated on the recipes in the book for using bread, leftover or otherwise. One of my problems is that I often read cookbooks when I’m having dinner by myself and one thing leads to another—and in the best case scenario, I bookmark the recipe to make later. In the worst case, if I have the ingredients on hand, I leave my dinner to get cold and jump up into the kitchen to make the recipe. And it just so happened that I had a half a loaf of brown bread leftover. Imagine that!

If you’ve not been to Tartine in San Francisco, it’s a hotspot on a corner on the edge of the Mission district and is always jam-packed. A long time ago, a local restaurant owner on the street confided to me that the space, which at the time was an old-fashioned bakery, was going up for sale and that I should buy it and open up a bakery myself.

I considered it, but was having coffee with two friends that already owned bakeries in San Francisco and they both looked at me, then looked at each other, and said, “Why don’t you just take over ours for a few weeks?” They followed that with a knowing cackle between them which erupted into peals of laughter.

brown bread crumbs

So I never did open my bakery in San Francisco, but Chad Robertson and his wife Elisabeth Pruitt have been a huge success and to be honest, the idea of waking up very early in the morning for the rest of my life wasn’t so appealing. So it all worked out for the best for everyone.

(Although Chad and Elisabeth might have something to say about that…)

brown bread ice cream scoop

If you don’t have any brown bread, any hearty whole-grain bread will do nicely. In the book, Chad uses basic country-style bread. I also give the option to use some brown sugar in the custard since I like the caramelized flavor it lends. But feel free to use all regular sugar. I have to say, I was considering cutting back on the sweetness a bit in the recipe for the crumbs but as I stirred up the bread bits with a smaller amount of sugar, I tasted as I went and kept adding more until I’d realized I added the recommended dosage, which was just perfect.

Brown Bread Ice Cream
About 1 1/4 quarts (1.25l)

Brown bread crumb recipe adapted from Tartine Bread by Chad Robertson

If you don’t have brown bread, you can use a hearty, whole grain bread that is somewhat crumbly. Even day-old bran muffins or gingerbread would be nice, especially if you plan to serve this ice cream around the holidays.

You’ll probably end up using about 2/3rds of the brown bread pieces, but if you’re anything like me, you can snack on the rest, or sprinkle them on top just before serving. Maybe with some chocolate sauce.

For the caramelized brown bread crumbs:

  • 2-3 slices of brown bread (250g, 9 ounces)
  • 3 tablespoons (45g) butter, salted or unsalted
  • 1/2 cup (100g) granulated sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

For the ice cream custard:

1 cup (250ml) whole milk
1 1/2 cups (375ml) heavy cream
1/3 cup (65g) granulated sugar plus 1/3 cup (65g) brown sugar (dark or light), or 3/4 cup (170g) granulated sugar
pinch of salt
8 ounces (225g) cream cheese, cubed, or sour cream (regular or lowfat of either)
5 large egg yolks
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
Optional: 1 tablespoon whiskey

1. To make the brown bread crumbs, preheat the oven to 350ºF (180ºC).

2. Crumble the bread into small, bite-sized bits. The largest should be no bigger than a kernel of corn.

3. In a skillet, heat the butter until it melts, then continue to cook until it starts to brown. Remove from heat and stir in the bread bits, 1/2 cup (100g) sugar, cinnamon, and salt.

4. Spread on the baking sheet and cook for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring a few times during baking, until the bread bits are well-toasted; a deep, dark brown.

5. Cool completely then store in an air-tight container until ready to use. (They can be made a few days in advance and stored at room temperature.)

6. To make the ice cream, heat the milk, 1/2 cup (125ml) of heavy cream, sugar and salt in a saucepan.

7. Pour the remaining 1 cup cream (250 ml) into a medium-sized bowl and the cubes or cream cheese or sour cream. Set a mesh strainer over the top and set the bowl in an ice bath.

7. In a separate bowl, stir together the egg yolks. Gradually pour some of the warm milk mixture into the yolks, whisking constantly as you pour. Scrape the warmed yolks and milk back into the saucepan.

8. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly and scraping the bottom with a heat-resistant spatula, until the custard thickens enough to coat the spatula.

9. Strain the custard into the heavy cream and cream cheese (or sour cream) and stir until smooth. Stir in the vanilla and whiskey, if using.

10. Refrigerate until thoroughly chilled, preferably overnight, then freeze in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Once churned, quickly fold in about two-thirds of the brown bread crumbs, or as much as to your liking, then store the ice cream in the freezer until firm and ready to serve.

Related Links and Recipes

Grape-Nuts Ice Cream (Yankee Magazine)

Tartine Bread (Website)

How to Make Ice Cream Without a Machine

vanilla Ice Cream

Salted Butter Caramel Ice Cream

Irish Brown Bread

Milk Chocolate and Black Pepper Ice Cream

Brown Bread Ice Cream (Nordljus)

Ice Cream FAQs

Banana-Brown Sugar Ice Cream

Buying an Ice Cream Machine

Recipes for Using Up Leftover Egg Whites

Quick Coconut and Saffron Ice Cream


Never miss a post!


  • Meagan
    November 10, 2010 6:09pm

    OK now that looks amazing…

  • November 10, 2010 6:12pm

    What what a fabulously unique recipe!

  • November 10, 2010 6:19pm

    Oh my goodness that looks fabulous. Two of my favorite things (bread and ice cream) combined into one gloriously decadent dessert?

    I think I must try this. :D

  • November 10, 2010 6:23pm

    Wow. This looks fantastic. What an interesting great idea for an ice cream flavor.

  • eko
    November 10, 2010 6:31pm

    Who would a-thunk it? The Irish of course ;-) I think this will be this year’s Christmas ice cream (last time it was your peppermint recipe.) I have never heard of grape-nut ice cream either…sounds intriguing. I have added grape-nuts to a banana bread recipe – wonder if I make that – then use the remainder for this ice cream. Well, not the first time – but an experiment worth thinking about. Is there a reason you put the ice cream in a flat type container – does it freeze or serve better that way?

    Love your blog – thank you, ever so much, for sharing your travel and baking/cooking/eating adventures!

  • November 10, 2010 6:46pm

    Mmmm! Oh, I absolutely love Irish brown bread and never thought of this for an ice cream flavor.

  • November 10, 2010 6:46pm

    Great post, as usual.
    I was lucky enough to spent a month working at Tartine Bakery for my externship after pastry school. I had a wonderful time there.
    I have a bit of a bread “obsession”, and seeing those loaves of bread been made from start to end by the masters, was a zen like experience.

  • November 10, 2010 6:51pm
    David Lebovitz

    Antonella: It was funny because last time I was in San Francisco, I really wanted some of his bread (which is excellent!) and went in during the day, but they told me, “The bread isn’t available until later on.” Which I thought was unusual since people usually buy bread in the morning to eat during the day. But it is worth waiting for..

    eko: It’s so it chills faster.

  • November 10, 2010 6:54pm

    This sounds amazing. I never would have thought of making ice cream with bread bits inside. Although it sort of reminds me of one of my favourite treats that I started making as a comfort food when I lived in France and was missing home, toasted bread (in France I used baguette, but here I use good, rustic wholegrain bread), smeared with salted butter and sprinkled with white sugar and cinnamon. I have even been known to have it for dinner….

  • Sam Breach
    November 10, 2010 6:58pm

    Brown bread ice cream was not an unusual thing when I was growing up. Maybe you misheard and it is common in OLD England, not NEW England ;)

  • November 10, 2010 7:04pm

    David, you managed to make me crave for ice cream while outside it looks like it is going to start snowing soon.

  • November 10, 2010 7:10pm

    Caramelized brown bread. Is it OK to just eat that and not make ice cream?

  • Simian
    November 10, 2010 7:14pm

    Yes, I love it and it is very common in England. It’s also peculiarly an ice cream you don’t need to use an ice cream maker with – Never known why, but it it just works with the traditional ice creams. Jane Grigson has a great recipe in her ‘English Food’, but my favourite recipe is from Beyond Nose to Tail (by Fergus Henderson) which includes a generous splash of Armagnac…mmmmmmmmmmmmmm!

  • Maya
    November 10, 2010 7:19pm

    This looks great! Have to say that I looooooooove GrapeNut ice cream (I’m from the Boston area, and we’d have it every summer when I was younger). You should really try it – it is amazing!

  • November 10, 2010 7:36pm

    bread and ice cream are my two favorite things to eat, so combining them seems to be a genius idea. i love it!

  • November 10, 2010 7:51pm

    Well now it certainly makes sense to me why I always dumped heaping spoonfuls of grapenuts over my ice cream as a kid & I grew up an east coaster. Now more uses for our whole wheat bread. Gorgeous ice cream David!

  • November 10, 2010 7:55pm

    oh. my. god. i want to leave my desk at work and run to go make some. my copy of tartine bread is in the mail, thank goodness.

  • November 10, 2010 8:26pm

    Just when you think you’ve heard it all … another thing bread can do well: ice cream! What a great idea. Being in Boston, I’d definitely “tradeup” my grapenut ice cream for some brown bread with cinnamon and butter.

  • November 10, 2010 8:47pm

    All hail to Jane Grigson, one of the greatest English cookery writers ever! If this idea is well-known in Britain and Ireland, it’s because she published the recipe in her lovely English Food book back in the 1970s. One of my favourite cookbooks ever.

  • Mrs Redboots
    November 10, 2010 8:52pm

    I, too, love brown bread ice cream, although I’ve never made it myself. My mother used to make it for dinner-parties. But then, when you think how delicious bread-and-butter pudding* is (especially Jamie Oliver’s recipe with brioche & marmalade), it’s not surprising that a similar recipe works frozen, too.

    *Not to be confused with bread pudding, which is equally delicious, but wouldn’t freeze into ice-cream!

  • stephanie
    November 10, 2010 9:13pm

    I don’t even really like ice cream, but after reading your posts I always think I should give it another try. I was in BHV recently and was actually looking at ice cream machines thinking of some of your recipes. But reason prevailed and I realized that there are too many other decadent things that I DO like so keeping ice cream off of my list is probably a good idea. The bread crumbs however….sound like a perfect yogurt topping :)

  • November 10, 2010 9:34pm

    Sounds ohhh so good!

  • November 10, 2010 9:46pm

    Although my mother is a fabulous baker, we grew up eating the “Boston” brown bread from the can (on occasion). It’s quite rich and moist. I’m curious how that would work. I’m sure it’s quite different from your brown bread (Irish Soda Bread) recipe.

  • Easy A
    November 10, 2010 9:49pm

    if any of you are ever in Los Angeles,
    give Scoops a try.
    ‘Brown Bread’ ice cream is their #1 flavor

  • November 10, 2010 10:03pm

    Hi David,
    I was researching ice cream machines on Amazon and noticed that the ICE 50 BC Cuisinart had a few problems. First the critiques almost all said it was extremely noisy and the mixer arm was problematic. I really would love an ice cream machine but need some advice on the best brand from an expert like you! Hope you can help.It’s my Christmas gift to myself.Thanks.

  • November 10, 2010 11:24pm

    Ok, I have to try this if for no other reason than I used to love, love to put grape nuts in my ice cream. They stay crunchy! And, caramelized brown bread sounds pretty fantastic.

  • WalterK
    November 11, 2010 12:16am

    I heart Tartine. Their pastry counter is visually stunning and their bread is fantastic.

  • November 11, 2010 12:31am

    Is it against the rules to have some of that caramelized bread in a bowl with milk for breakfast? ;-)

  • Jim
    November 11, 2010 2:05am

    Re: your tweet about “The Wraps”…

    It is much worse than you can even imagine; seen in 2008 on the rue Montorgueil:

    What has the world come to.

    We love what you write, and we read the blog every day.


    Jim Freeman

  • November 11, 2010 2:06am

    That sounds extremely interesting! It’s like glorified breadcrumbs mixed in with ice cream :P

  • November 11, 2010 3:54am

    Bread and chocolate…bread and cream….bread and ice cream. I like the evolution of it. Thinking gingerbread.

  • November 11, 2010 4:04am

    This is quite an unusual flavor, but worth trying, especially while visiting Ireland next May! BTW, thank you for getting back to me on my question about traveling there. We are looking forward to it after seeing your posts!

  • Nicole Hough
    November 11, 2010 4:05am

    I think I bookmark your blog every day – which isn’t really very efficient – but I just don’t want to FORGET to go back and find fantabulous recpies like this one! Oh I can’t wait to make it. And PS your brown bread recipe looks amazing but this post gave me a serious craving for that brown bread in a can from my childhood. PPS The first recipe of yours I made was your bacon ice cream. It became legendary in these here parts.

  • November 11, 2010 4:20am

    okay, the ice cream looks fabulous…but what really got my attention today is the Libby’s canned pumpkin for $7.95 each at amazon…hahahahah!!!

  • Kvcoombs
    November 11, 2010 4:52am

    David, Grape Nut ice cream certainly does exist, and I Usually find it a disappointing smush of good ice cream and bloated grape nuts…but I do order it from time to time (when not in a moose tracks mood) and there is something there. I promise to research this pressing ice cream dilemma next summer and if I find a worthy candidate in my New England canvassing, I will notify you promptly.
    I too love brown bread, preferably with raisins and maple butter…in ice cream? Why not?
    Thanks for the entertaining blog!

  • Ron Dufault
    November 11, 2010 5:10am

    Hi David.
    I first had this brown bread ice cream at a pub in Garrykennedy, County Tipperary called Larkin’s. It is addictive. I had this for dessert everytime we visited the pub, it’s an excellent dessert.

  • November 11, 2010 5:59am

    OK – this looks wonderful and I want to eat it.
    Because it has brown bread in it, does that make it healthy??

  • MarinMom
    November 11, 2010 7:30am

    Hi David,
    I’ve been following your blog since July (as I prepared for my first trip to Paris in August). I’ve been enjoying it immensely. Loved the Ireland postings, and will be absolutely adding this recipe to my St. Patrick’s Day menu (I make a mean brown bread!).

  • November 11, 2010 7:32am

    For a full five minutes, I sat here thinking about the Wonder White bread and lame-o supermarket vanilla ice cream in my freezer.

    If it weren’t for the fact that I’m sick and can’t taste much, I think I would’ve done my imagined sub-par recreation of this ice cream awesomeness.

    Instead, I think I’ll go take another panadol. Sigh.

  • Susan
    November 11, 2010 7:44am

    I have a loaf of Anna Dama bread in my freezer. I got the recipe from Simply Recipes site and it’s delicious! It has a gingerbready sort of flavor from the molassas in it. Can’t wait to try this ice cream with a couple of slices. (Elise’s recipe is no more difficult than making a quick bread, though it is a yeast should try it!)

  • Geraldine In Spain
    November 11, 2010 9:30am

    David, you never CEASE to astound me! Another great. Even though today it feels like Siberia here in SUNNY SPAIN, with my cashmere socks and hat on at 8:00 a.m. I’m rushing to the kitchen to try this recipe. I always have great Brown Bread at home! THANK YOU.

    Geraldine in Spain

  • November 11, 2010 9:33am

    What an intriguing ice cream flavour. At first it sounds rather odd but then when you look at the process it makes perfect sense. I’ve never been to Ireland but born and bred in England, I have never come across this ice cream flavour. I wish I had now.

  • November 11, 2010 9:34am

    I was just wondering when it is you post your blog, as by the time I get to read it, which is usually first thing for me and I am in your time zone, you always already have at least 40 comments. Do you write it in the middle of the night? Brown bread ice cream sounds interesting, I suppose you could also make this ice cream with left over christmas pudding or christmas cake (a little obsessed as I’m about to start making mine!) will keep it in mind! I wonder how my French supperclub will take to it!

  • November 11, 2010 9:52am

    Hi David,
    I had a love affair with BB ice cream over the summer as well. Woke up to a barrage of emails this morning asking if I’d seen your lovely post…..I, too, posted a (not as gorgeous as yours) recipe for Brown Bread + Whiskey ice cream in Sep… really is such a divine combination!
    Imen x

  • November 11, 2010 11:24am

    Ooh that so makes me want to buy an ice cream maker!!! I tried brown bread ice cream once and loved it, but haven’t seen it since! That looks delish. Just may have to borrow someone’s ice cream maker … Thanks for posting!

  • November 11, 2010 11:31am

    Joan: I actually don’t understand those comments about the noise of the machine. Almost all household appliances; electric blenders, stand mixers, coffee grinders, vacuum cleaners, etc..make noise.

    (In fact I read in a recent New Yorker article that manufacturers know how to make noiseless vacuum cleaners but they find that customers didn’t think the machine was effective unless it made a lot of noise.)

    So am not sure why people expect an ice cream maker to be silent. One can buy a much quieter machine for a lot more money, that has better sound insulation if they wish. But for the price, I think the ICE-50 is a pretty good machine and I’ve been happy with it. I keep mine in the other room when churning, which seems like a pretty simple solution.

    Imen: That looks great!

    Jim: The French love le Philadelphia..

  • November 11, 2010 11:39am

    We Brits also use leftover Christmas pudding to make ice cream in a similar way. So good especially if it’s a boozy pud – or pour brandy over it!

  • November 11, 2010 12:25pm

    Yum, I just need to finish up the chocolate sorbet so there’s some room in my freezer….

    I second Tricia on the Christmas Pudding ice cream, it’s a favourite of mine.

  • Anjali
    November 11, 2010 1:17pm

    Earlier in the year I found a Wheat Bread recipe in Iced where it has you mix in the fine fresh wheat crumbs into the custard base. Neat twist here.

  • Arek
    November 11, 2010 1:47pm

    This looks fantastic.

  • Maggie
    November 11, 2010 1:51pm

    I made this once years ago, with a different recipe. It is the only thing I’ve ever made where my husband found it so awful that he said “I’m not eating that…” ;-)

  • November 11, 2010 3:33pm

    Completely forgot about Grape-Nuts ice cream….my grandmother used to make it with maple flavoring in an old hand cranked machine. The cousins took turns sitting on it while another turned the handle under the tree in the hot San Joaquin valley.

  • Stella Mac
    November 11, 2010 7:11pm

    just returned from Ireland and could not get enough brown bread. i have been making piles of it, trying to perfect the recipe. Now i know what to do with all of those half loaves…beside feeding them to the chickens.
    Nice work!

  • Corey
    November 11, 2010 7:17pm

    This reminds me of a dish I had in Santiago, Chile a few years ago. The restaurant Confiteria Torres served a Toasted Flour Ice Cream. It was fantastic.

  • November 11, 2010 8:09pm

    Bread, butter and sugar finally take on the icebox. Love it!

  • November 11, 2010 8:19pm

    David, I agree I found it peculiar that Tartine served bread after 4pm. From what I gathered is to allow the bread baker to have more of a normal working schedule, for a change, and by 3pm most of the baking for the bakery is done for the day. That’s when bread baker can take over the huge deck oven.

  • M'Lissa
    November 11, 2010 8:27pm

    Sounds interesting. In the past few months I’ve come to trust everything you say so I will definitely try this.
    After recently purchasing an ice cream maker & “The Perfect Scoop” and trying many of your ice cream flavors you’ve won me over. I quickly moved on to “Ready for Dessert” with even more amazing results (no one could speak after tasting the cheesecake brownies). Everything has turned out perfectly.
    Along the way, my sister & I have had such fun re-creating your masterpieces while the rest of the extended family anxiously wait in anticipation to see what’s for dessert today.
    Your writings of your life in Paris and elsewhere constantly make my mouth water and make me laugh out loud. I look forward to each new post, thanks for sharing.

  • November 11, 2010 8:36pm
    David Lebovitz

    Corey: A while ago I did a toasted corn flour ice cream which was kind of an oddity, but rather tasty. I’ve played around with toasting flour and it is a wonderful way to bring out new, and unexpected, flavors.

    M’Lissa: Glad you’re enjoying my ice cream book so much..happy churning!

    Antonella: As someone who isn’t thrilled waking up too early in the morning, I can sympathize…

  • November 11, 2010 8:37pm

    Oh yes! When we were in England a few years ago, we ran across brown bread ice cream at the mill museum in Lower Slaughter (here: We got one scoop and it was so delicious, we considered getting another.

    No, we thought. We’re not hungry. We’ll get some more later.

    But later, there was no more brown bread ice cream to be found. Oh, how we wailed and gnashed out teeth.

    We went to England again and I googled and searched and stopped in every single ice cream shop we passed in search of more brown bread ice cream, but they all looked at me like I was crazy.

    This recipe seals the decision to buy an ice cream maker.

    BTW, my mom used to get granola ice cream at the commissary when we lived in the Panama Canal Zone. Maybe that’s where it all got diverted.

  • Joan Bedard
    November 11, 2010 9:37pm

    Dear David,
    Thank you for your advice. I am feeling more confident investing in the ice cream machine after your intelligent and funny reasoning. Sorry I didn’t notice that you had already discussed purchasing ice cream machines in your post of 2006. You are very patient. Thanks again.

  • Jeffrey Massie
    November 11, 2010 10:18pm

    I grew up in Connecticut, and I can remember Grape-Nuts ice cream from Heibeck’s in Georgetown, along Route 7 halfway between Norwalk and Danbury. However, Heibeck’s seemed to be about the only place in CT that had it. Where it was (and still is) most common was in Rhode Island. Especially remember it at at Gray’s in Tiverton, east of Newport near the Massachusetts border:

    Also known for ginger ice cream (swoon) and that RI favorite, coffee ice cream.

  • November 11, 2010 11:50pm

    David, this looks incredible. Seriously better than any ice cream I’ve seen to date. I’m going to have to try it and soon! Heck, I may be leaving my dinner half eaten as well.

  • Jeannette
    November 12, 2010 12:43am

    I have had the Cuisinart Ice cream machine for over two years and use it every week and I am very happy with it. It is noisy but, like you David, I keep mine in the utility room and close the door so the noise doesn’t bother me! I have had no trouble with it at all.
    By the way, I am in the UK and have seen recipes for Brown Bread ice-cream in lots of books but have never been tempted to make it before until seeing it here, now I am tempted!

  • November 12, 2010 1:09am

    I would never had thought to add the taste of bread to ice cream, but I found myself beginning to wonder what this would taste like, poured over your recipe and now I’ve gotta try this one for myself. I’m a nut over all things ice cream, so pretty sure I’m going to love it :)

  • November 12, 2010 6:19am

    This sounds divine but grape nuts ice cream?! Why was I not told about this earlier! I love the subtle malt-y flavor of grape nuts and find them completely addicting. It’s nice to know some people in New England agree!

  • November 12, 2010 6:22am

    This sounds divine but grape nuts ice cream?! Why was I not told about this earlier! I find the subtle malt-y flavor of grape nuts completely addicting and love them mixed in to so many things. It’s nice to know the people of New England agree!

  • Henry
    November 12, 2010 6:40am

    The English chef James Martin also has a recipe for brown bread ice cream:
    Brown bread ice cream

    Serves 4-6

    175g brown wholemeal breadcrumbs

    300ml double cream

    300ml single cream

    125g icing sugar

    2 egg yolks

    1tbs rum (optional)

    2 egg whites

    Pre-heat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. Spread the breadcrumbs out on a baking tray and toast in the oven for a couple of minutes until crisp and slightly browned. Meanwhile, beat the creams with the sugar. Mix together the yolks and rum, if using, and add to the cream mixture, beating well. When the breadcrumbs are cool, fold them gently and evenly into the cream mixture. Lastly, whip the whites of the eggs until stiff and fold into the mixture.

    Transfer to a sealable container, place in the freezer and store until needed. (There is no need to stir this ice cream while it freezes.)

  • November 12, 2010 5:01pm

    Hooray!! This has been on my list of recipes to try soon…I will definitely try your version first…thanks!!

  • Sini
    November 12, 2010 7:28pm

    Wow! I can imagine how wonderful this tastes although at first this combination might sound a little odd. What a shame I don’t have an ice cream maker… Can I make it without one?

    …and thank you also for mentioning ice cream bread on twitter! I mean how awesome is that!?! Here is a bread+ice cream revolution going on ^^

  • November 12, 2010 8:08pm

    Glad you were able to enjoy brown bread ice cream while you were here! It’s a flavour we often have in our shops and it’s always popular. We use brown sugar to give it a deeper flavour, and sometimes even a bit of Guinness! Here’s one of our takes on it:

  • Susan
    November 12, 2010 9:43pm

    This looks amazing! You must try Grape-Nuts ice cream drizzled with warm (real of course) maple syrup. Yummy! Here in New Hampshire Grape-Nuts ice cream is readily available as is the syrup.

  • Alex
    November 13, 2010 12:28am

    I’m so excited to try this! I’ve been putting Grape-Nuts on top of my ice cream for years, but given that I live in the Mid-Atlantic instead of New England I had no idea that Grape-Nuts ice cream actually existed! My roommate always thought I was crazy (and quite noisy with all the crunching)! This is the perfect recipe for trying out my Kitchenaid ice cream maker attachment.

  • Liz
    November 13, 2010 3:09am

    Tulmeadow Farms in West Simsbury, CT has Grape Nut ice cream if you are every around there!

  • I can’t quite imagine this. I’ll keep it in mind to try sometime.

  • November 14, 2010 2:53pm

    I have never really liked brown bread even with all the nutritionists advice, but after reading this, I’m for second thoughts.

  • November 14, 2010 3:19pm

    Of course Russians eat blini with caviar ( if they can afford it) and they follow them up with shots of ice-cold vodka. Then goes the superhot borsch. Than goes heaven.
    Unfortunately, today in Moscow, it is mush easier to find posh sushi bars than traditional Russian cuisine.

  • November 15, 2010 1:09am

    Hello David,

    I tried this recipe this week-end and it was great! I got confused with the ingredients though, instead of buying some “crème épaisse” (for the heavy cream) I got some crème fraîche… But it was really nice anyway. I used some “pain d’épices”.
    I see that previous commenters have used Christmas pudding, and I think it could be really nice, but would you toast it in the same way as the gingerbread?
    As good Belgians my friends asked me whether it wouldn’t be better with speculoos :-)
    Thank you for sharing this recipe!


  • November 15, 2010 3:53am

    With the exception of a few post-college years in Manhattan, I’ve lived my whole life in Connecticut. I’ve never heard of Grape Nut ice cream. Apparently it exists, based on all the other comments, but I must ask WHY??????? Of all the cereals that you could make in to ice cream, why choose something healthy?

  • November 15, 2010 5:37am

    Hi David,

    I enjoyed reading about your excitement in wanting to create your own brown bread ice-cream. I am also that way when I hear about an interesting recipe. What also interested me is that I too was fascinated by the use of bread in ice-cream. The first time I ate it,( made by a friend), I could not believe that the ice-cream contained bread.
    I have made it several times since, using wholewheat bread as well, or crumbled cookies.
    My favorite flavor is Kulfi, an Indian version of ice-cream. I have put up my link if you care to check it or try it.
    I am reluctant to try yours because I do not cook with eggs, but I may try my egg-less version of it.



  • Agnes
    November 15, 2010 12:45pm

    Elizabeth David mentions some very old recipes for Brown Bread Ice Cream in her wonderful book “Is there a nutmeg in the house?” (available at Amazon). I like her essays on ice cream very much.

  • Marcus Austin
    November 15, 2010 10:05pm

    Wow, Grape Nuts in ice cream… I’m always willing to try something new. Has anyone else tried this recipe?

  • November 16, 2010 7:38pm

    WOW! you know dear David I think you are the Ice Crema King!! Really This look specialy yumm, I have to make, thanks for sharin.
    Not time ago I made a Quince Ice Crema, was yummy! Maybe you know this taste!
    x gloria

  • Juz
    November 17, 2010 1:36am

    I made this at the weekend – thanks so much for the recipe. Was delicious topped with lashings of the leftover crumbs.

  • November 17, 2010 3:18am

    Hey David,
    I’m from New England, too, and the only place I’ve EVER heard of, and tried, Grape Nut ice cream was Shady Glen, in CT. It was a 50’s style burger/ice cream place I worked at in high school for an few years of my life I’m not proud of, but its fans were hardcore! People who liked their Grape Nut (and there weren’t many who were even willing to try it) were diehard fans. They never tried anything else. The way they made it there, I’m quite sure they used brown sugar on the actual crumbs themselves, though. Either way, great recipe.

  • Jenifer Smith
    November 20, 2010 8:05am


    I made your ice cream at work this week. It was amazing!!!!! We used the ground up bread pieces to coat caramels. Oh so good, thanks for the inspiration.


  • November 24, 2010 2:43pm

    You have no idea how happy this makes me. I’m a Mainer and we always have a can of B&M Brown bread and beans in the cupboard. I’m going to make this for my dad for XMas and he’s going to go insane with happiness. Thank you. Thank you.

  • Cucperson
    November 24, 2010 8:05pm

    Alice Toklas has a recipe for brown bread ice cream in her book “Aromas and Flavors of Past and Present”. yum yum

  • omgfantastic
    November 29, 2010 11:54pm

    i second the los angeles scoops recommendation.

    i get the brown bread ice cream whenever i’m there.

    i didn’t know it was based on an old recipe, from europe. i’ll have to try to make it one day.

  • December 1, 2010 1:46pm

    This looks so delicious. I especially like the look of the brown bread crumbs folded into the churned ice-cream base.

  • December 12, 2010 2:20pm

    this is may be the weirdest ice cream ive come across! it’s so weird I just got to try it!

  • Michael
    December 15, 2010 7:20pm

    I’m Irish, I’ll claim a part in this idea,
    I love brown bread ice cream!
    Does anyone know if you could swap it with a few slices of crumbly gingerbread?
    It could be a nice Christmassy ice cream.
    Thanks !

  • Jill
    January 5, 2011 11:41pm

    I made some of this last week and my friend and I scooped some on Russian Imperial Stout, like a beer float. Sounds weird, but it was amazing!!

  • Tina
    January 21, 2011 1:57pm

    I like to try this ice cream recipe too… I think there is really so much to see in this blog. No wonder it was included in the Time Online Top 50 World’s Best Food Blogs and my congratulations. What is so surprising is the number or comments coming in. Many people love your work.

  • kd in Cincy
    February 1, 2011 6:14am

    My mother makes brown bread all the time and has as long as I can remember, so for Christmas, I made my siblings this ice cream. It is divine! I can’t wait to try some of your other ice creams. Thank you!